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The best books by Neil Peart

Started by pdw1, March 23, 2021, 22:19:17 PM

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From Prog magazine/Louder Website

The best books by Neil Peart: A guide to the late Rush drummer's best writing
By Scott Munro (Prog)

Neil Peart not only left us with an incredible body of music and lyrics, but also an impressive array of books and travelogues. Here's our pick of his best work

https://www.loudersound.com/features/best-neil-peart-books

A gentle wander through NPs non musical writing
Better drowned than duffers if not duffers wont drown

Although I own a few of them, I only ever read Ghost Rider. I found it a little detached, despite being about an uncomfortably personal subject. And I thought it could have done with an editor. But it was very nice to have. I think I'll read it again, it's been 17 years or so.

The others, while I've enjoyed dipping into them here and there, never really grabbed me.

I didn't find many of them very enjoyable to read - but I loved the audiobooks of them.  I found that far more engaging.
Anger is a gift.

I've read a few and would struggle to describe them as 'engaging'. Clockwork Angels I found to be borderline tosh (how much of that was down to NP or his co-writer -??)

I read Ghost Rider, and enjoyed it for what it was. A personal journey/healing process

They arent great books IMHO. Written by a guy I was interested in, but his style is difficult and purple prose (too many words, bit pretentious).

I think  his lyrics were often very good, because in the early to mid rush years he was able to create a less is more style, and convey a lot of meaning and beauty into a relatively short number of words.

However in his books, he has a much larger volume of words to be able to use, but still tries to cram as much into every sentence as possible, and IMHO this also then flowed over to his lyrics. If you look at the songs from the last 3 albums, the sheer volume of words Geddy had to contend with was ridiculous (which makes me wonder why he then filled any other available spaces with the oooohs and aaaaahs)
The new songs are an abomination

I am not a big book reader, never have been. I read a couple of his books over a period of time when I was on night shift. 'Cycling in East Africa' and 'Travelling music'. The only reason I read those were because they were part of a prize I won on here for having the 10 millionth hit. Unlike the music he made with RUSH, there's not a lot I can remember about them.

March 26, 2021, 09:02:29 AM #6 Last Edit: March 26, 2021, 09:07:27 AM by Matt2112
Quote from: Slim on March 24, 2021, 00:14:48 AMAlthough I own a few of them, I only ever read Ghost Rider. I found it a little detached, despite being about an uncomfortably personal subject. And I thought it could have done with an editor. But it was very nice to have. I think I'll read it again, it's been 17 years or so.

The others, while I've enjoyed dipping into them here and there, never really grabbed me.
Completely agree with that view of Ghost Rider.  It described the actual journey well enough, but I never got the sense of how his feelings and emotions were evolving after starting off at such a dark and hopeless place. So I found it very underwhelming.
The keys to happiness

March 26, 2021, 09:05:01 AM #7 Last Edit: March 26, 2021, 09:08:21 AM by Matt2112
Quote from: DavidL on March 24, 2021, 01:28:13 AMI've read a few and would struggle to describe them as 'engaging'. Clockwork Angels I found to be borderline tosh (how much of that was down to NP or his co-writer -??)
Yes, I found Clockwork Angels so badly written as to be almost unreadable.  Whereas the album is magnificent!
The keys to happiness

Other than Ghost Rider, I've read The Masked Rider, which I quite enjoyed, and Travelling Music, which I found a bit...pointless.

I'd like to read Roadshow though, which is obviously much more about the day job.
The keys to happiness

Quote from: Matt2112 on March 26, 2021, 09:07:02 AMOther than Ghost Rider, I've read The Masked Rider, which I quite enjoyed, and Travelling Music, which I found a bit...pointless.

I'd like to read Roadshow though, which is obviously much more about the day job.
Roadshow was decent enough, but again just too wordy.

I cant remember which book it was, but he mad a comment in one of his books which really wound me up. He mentioned looking out at the crowd, and seeing people wearing T-Shirts from "awful" bands. Didn't sit quite right with me that one.....
The new songs are an abomination

Quote from: Jonners on March 26, 2021, 10:16:35 AMRoadshow was decent enough, but again just too wordy.

I cant remember which book it was, but he mad a comment in one of his books which really wound me up. He mentioned looking out at the crowd, and seeing people wearing T-Shirts from "awful" bands. Didn't sit quite right with me that one.....
Unfortunately, he did have a tendency to look down his nose at some of the things that were enjoyed by those that paid for his houses, cars and motorcycles

March 26, 2021, 11:31:22 AM #11 Last Edit: March 26, 2021, 11:32:56 AM by Fishy
Quote from: Jonners on March 26, 2021, 10:16:35 AMRoadshow was decent enough, but again just too wordy.

I cant remember which book it was, but he mad a comment in one of his books which really wound me up. He mentioned looking out at the crowd, and seeing people wearing T-Shirts from "awful" bands. Didn't sit quite right with me that one.....



Hardly a surprise when he didn't.t appear to have much time for Rush fans....

Think I managed Ghost Rider but only just....

From the Land of Honest Men.

Quote from: DavidL on March 26, 2021, 10:25:37 AMUnfortunately, he did have a tendency to look down his nose at some of the things that were enjoyed by those that paid for his houses, cars and motorcycles
There's nothing wrong with honesty mate.

Quote from: zoony on March 27, 2021, 20:25:35 PMThere's nothing wrong with honesty mate.
No but disdain for your audience, is probably best kept to yourself, IMHO