We need to talk about Boris

Started by Matt2112, July 27, 2019, 04:07:58 am

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rufus the dawg

Quote from: Slim on November 11, 2019, 01:04:54 amOh dear! This one aged rather badly, as well.
I think you will find it slowly builds a picture of a man that is corrupt, lies all the time, does know his own facts and useless at his job.

Slim

Quote from: Matt2112 on November 11, 2019, 01:22:32 amThree months is a long time in politics.
It is. But truth has a timeless quality :)

Matt2112

The keys to happiness

Slim

Well - an observation about foresight might be more apt to this discussion. And if you'd asked me three months ago, I would have told you you were wrong.

rufus the dawg

Quote from: Slim on November 11, 2019, 21:09:10 pmIt is. But truth has a timeless quality :)
Boris and truth don't go in the same sentence.

Maybe Liar and boris works better. But you're from Faridge/ERG hq and there is no point in arguing with you. You would argue black is white to support him.

Matt2112

Quote from: Slim on November 15, 2019, 12:32:39 pmWell - an observation about foresight might be more apt to this discussion. And if you'd asked me three months ago, I would have told you you were wrong.
But not why? Right, so with a little shifting of the  goal posts, you're crediting yourself with astute foresight...post hoc. Hmmm.

And what to make of the Telegraph report yesterday that - I stress, reportedly - the very thing I foresaw was being put into motion?  Sure, it may be just paper talk - what we know though is that your mate Nige has unilaterally enacted what amounts to a pact.

So, not so cut and dried I'd suggest; I reckon I was detecting the scent of something not radically dissimilar to what's being played out.
The keys to happiness

döm

If anyone is interested in keeping tabs on how often Boris Johnson lies (clue, very) this is an excellent website.  The sickening thing is how often he goes unchallenged.

https://boris-johnson-lies.com/
You can check out any time you like but you can never leave!

Slim

Quote from: rufus the dawg on November 15, 2019, 17:18:43 pmBoris and truth don't go in the same sentence.

Maybe Liar and boris works better. But you're from Faridge/ERG hq and there is no point in arguing with you. You would argue black is white to support him.
You aren't capable of forming a sensible, considered opinion, Rufus. That's all you're telling us here, apart from the fact that you can't spell.

Slim

Quote from: döm on November 19, 2019, 00:25:28 amIf anyone is interested in keeping tabs on how often Boris Johnson lies (clue, very) this is an excellent website.  The sickening thing is how often he goes unchallenged.

https://boris-johnson-lies.com/

Some of these are self-evidently true, others are legitimate opinions that the editor of this site may unwisely disagree with, but are certainly not "lies".

If you take this site seriously, you've been lied to. And clearly, it's worked.

This one is the most laughable distortion, I think:

"Parliament refused finally to give approval for us to come out on October 31 which was a great disappointment"

Facts

Parliament did not refuse to give final approval to the UK leaving the EU on 31 October. It voted to approve the second reading of the Withdrawal Agreement Bill. It rejected the government's programme motion on the grounds that parliament would only have three days to debate the bill. It was the prime minister who took the decision to pause and then abandon the bill. Parliament had no opportunity to give final approval to the bill.

Verdict

The prime minister's statement was a lie.


That's absolute bollocks as you must surely know. Parliament knew full well that it was obstructing the UK from leaving the EU on 31st October. It had pretended to be afraid of a no deal Brexit, and it demonstrated that it was afraid of a deal as well.

All you're doing is demonstrating the depths of dishonestly that the Prime Minister's laughing stock detractors have to stoop to to try to call his integrity into question, a gutter tactic.

I read a few more. The one about Corbyn and the Novichok attack is hilarious; no sane person would believe the spin they put on that. Desperate stuff.

But I'm pleased and proud to be reminded that people like this are frightened of a Conservative government and an effective Conservative leader.

rufus the dawg

November 20, 2019, 16:46:59 pm #69 Last Edit: November 20, 2019, 22:40:07 pm by rufus the dawg
Quote from: Slim on November 19, 2019, 01:08:14 amThat's absolute bollocks as you must surely know. Parliament knew full well that it was obstructing the UK from leaving the EU on 31st October. It had pretended to be afraid of a no deal Brexit, and it demonstrated that it was afraid of a deal as well.
Of course you will give evidence of this?


Parliament voted to scrutinise BJ's deal - fact. BJ did not want parliament to scrutinise the deal because it was a bad deal, worse than TM's with a border down the Irish sea. I thought Brexit was about the UK parliament taking back control. Or what you are really meaning is that Parliament should do what Slims thinks it should do.

So the web site is correct and you are wrong again.

Slim

Quote from: rufus the dawg on November 20, 2019, 16:46:59 pmOf course you will give evidence of this?


Parliament voted to scrutinise BJ's deal - fact. BJ did not want parliament to scrutinise the deal because it was a bad deal, worse than TM's with a border down the Irish sea. I thought Brexit was about the UK parliament taking back control. Or what you are really meaning is that Parliament should do what Slims thinks it should do.

So the web site is correct and you are wrong again.

Needless to say, it is you who are wrong. But at least you're consistent.

The evidence is in the news, and in Parliament's actions. Parliament voted to delay the Prime Minister's deal. This was clearly a deliberate tactic to frustrate Brexit yet again - hitherto the excuse had been that Parliament was afraid of a "no deal" Brexit.

Hilarious that you think that opposition parties that had already stated unequivocally that they would reject the deal wanted to "scrutinise" it. Incredibly funny that you think that parties who by that time had sworn to frustrate any sort of Brexit, at any cost, wanted to "scrutinise" a bill to leave the EU. What they would actually have done was to amend the bill until it was no longer acceptable to the government, and no longer a viable vehicle to leave the EU.

You're easy game for them, Rufus. Too easy.

rufus the dawg

You want BJs deal more than TMs deal. BJs deal is worse than TMs. BJs deal breaks up the UK. weird.

and you do not want parliament to scrutinise the deal put forward. I see, you do not want parliament then you want a dictatorship. 

So what if parliament frustrates bjs deal. You want UK parliament to rule the UK and that is what they are doing. They hold government to account. The problem with Thatcher Blair governments they were able to whip policy without any proper scrutiny and so making very bad policy.

Bisto

The Guardian

Boris Johnson still not agreeing to Andrew Neil interview
PM said he was 'perfectly happy' to be questioned but has not set date for appearance


Jim Waterston Media Editor
Sun 1 Dec 2019 15.29 GMTLast modified on Sun 1 Dec 2019 15.32 GMT

There is no sign that BORIS JOHNSON will agree to an interview with Andrew Neil before the end of the election campaign, with both the BBC and the Conservatives simply saying that negotiations are ongoing.
With little over a week until polling day, the prime minister has still not set a date for his one-on-one interview on primetime television, despite every other party leader agreeing to take part.
On Friday the BBC insisted it would not allow Johnson to appear on its flagship politics programmes until
 he had agreed a time to sit down with Neil, only to relent following the London Bridge terror attack on the basis that the country should hear from its prime minister during a time of crisis.

Johnson duly appeared on Sunday's edition of The Andrew Marr Show, where he insisted he was "perfectly happy to be interviewed by any interviewer called Andrew from the BBC" but there is still no confirmed date for the programme, with only a handful of potential slots available before polls open next Thursday.
Neil, who used to be Johnson's boss at the Spectator, is perceived as one of the BBC's toughest political interviewers. His head-to-head with Jeremy Corbyn created days of negative headlines for Labour over antisemitism and funding for Labour's spending plans.

Corbyn's team are furious that Johnson appears to be trying to avoid being put under similar scrutiny, insisting they were assured the prime minister had signed up for a similar interview before agreeing to put up their candidate. BBC sources strongly insist they never told Labour the prime minister was definitely confirmed before Corbyn's appearance.

News websites such as MailOnline, which had taken the prime minister's comments as confirmation that he would definitely be interviewed by Neil, were contacted by the Conservatives and have now toned down their headlines. Both the Conservatives and the BBC have played down any chance of the interview being confirmed imminently.
A BBC spokesperson reiterated its stance that it urged "Boris Johnson to take part in the prime-time Andrew Neil interview as other leaders have done".
Although the prime minister's appearances on Marr will have reached millions of people, a primetime weeknight interview with Neil would attract a substantially higher audience. But with the Lib Dem leader, Jo Swinson, scheduled to be interviewed by Neil on Wednesday night, and the Brexit party's Nigel Farage on Thursday, there are just three slots available for the prime minister to appear next week.
No good deed goes unpunished!

No amount of anxiety can change the future. No amount of regret can change the past.

Bisto

Boris Johnsonb blames Labour for release of London Bridge killer
PM says it is 'ridiculous' that terrorist Usman Khan - freed from jail in 2018 - got out early

Peter Walker Political Correspondent
 @peterwalker99
Sun 1 Dec 2019 12.28 GMTLast modified on Sun 1 Dec 2019 23.34 GMT

Boris Johnson has sought to blame Labour for the release of Usman Khan, the convicted terrorist who murdered two people on London Bridge on Friday, as the aftermath of the attack became an increasingly politicised election issue.
In an interview on BBC One's The Andrew Marr Show
 the prime minister said it was "ridiculous" that someone such as Khan should have been freed midway through an earlier sentence, and pledged to change the law.

He said: "The reason this killer was out on the streets was because of automatic early release which was brought in by a leftie government."
But challenged on the role of cuts to police, probation services and the judicial system under 10 years of Conservative rule, Johnson repeatedly sought to separate himself from this, and present his government as entirely separate.
"I've only been in office for 120 days," he said. Asked by Marr about decisions on public spending taken since 2010, Johnson replied: "I'm a new prime minister. We take a different approach."
In the interview Johnson repeatedly sought to make political capital over the attack by Khan, who was freed under licence a year ago after being jailed for his part in an al-Qaida-inspired bombing plot. Khan stabbed two people to death before being shot dead by police.
"I think it is ridiculous, I think it is repulsive, that individuals as dangerous as this man should be allowed out after serving only eight years and that's why we are going to change the law," Johnson told Marr.
He blamed the previous Labour government for the decision: "His release was necessary under the law because of the automatic early release scheme under which he was sentenced, that was the reality, and that was brought in by Labour with the support of Jeremy Corbyn and the rest of the Labour party."
The reality of the case is more complex. Khan was jailed in 2012 under an an indeterminate public protection sentence (IPP), a system scrapped under the coalition the same year. But an appeal in 2013 saw the sentence replaced by one of 16 years, and he was freed after serving just under half.
Since the attack, Johnson has pledged to end early release for people convicted of terrorism.
The father of the first of Khan's victims to be named, Jack Merritt, who worked to help rehabilitate prisoners, has said that his son "would not wish his death to be used as the pretext for more draconian sentences or for detaining people unnecessarily".
Johnson told Marr there were "probably about 74" convicted terrorists who had now been freed, saying these would be "properly invigilated to make sure there is no threat".
Speaking earlier on Sky News, Jeremy Corbyn argued that a better approach would be to focus more on prison services, and the parole and rehabilitation help prisoners receive when they leave.
Asked by Marr whether he should apologise for cuts to probation services, Johnson said: "Obviously, I think we should be investing more in the criminal justice system."
Asked why the Conservatives had not done this during their time in office, Johnson said his government was "new in our approach, and it's new in the way we will tackle issues of public services".

Questioned about the closure of nearly 300 magistrates and crown courts since 2010, he replied: "We of course understand, now is the time to make investments not just in the NHS, not just in policing, not just in education, but in our criminal justice system."
During an often combative interview, which saw Marr repeatedly interrupt the prime minister to ask him to address the question asked, Johnson gave ground on several issues, accepting that 40 promised new hospitals were not as yet fully funded.
"Of course not, but you don't commit seed money unless you have a convincing case and a rationale for building that hospital, and you're determined to go on and do it," he said.
Johnson also conceded that though he had entered No 10 promising to tackle the social care crisis, the Conservative manifesto contained few details of how this would be done. "I accept that the full plan needs to be developed," he said.
No good deed goes unpunished!

No amount of anxiety can change the future. No amount of regret can change the past.

zoony