The Conservative Party Leadership Election of 2019

Started by Slim, May 29, 2019, 15:23:15 pm

Previous topic - Next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

DavidL

Quote from: The Letter R on July 15, 2019, 12:31:28 pmSo it's OK for civil servants who have signed the official secrets act to share Government communications externally and really our Ambassador should have verbally communicated to an envoy and trusted them to accurately communicate this to others....hmmm - that's going to work well!!??
This could have been malicious intervention by another state.

Verbal communication works well and is fairly secure.

Chris Quartly

You're embarrassing yourself here with this double-down...
Last.fm playlist of previous 7 days:<br /><br /><br />Q's Comps<br /><br />Some Other Suckers Parade

DavidL

July 17, 2019, 00:40:59 am #227 Last Edit: July 17, 2019, 00:54:31 am by DavidL
Quote from: Chris Quartly on July 16, 2019, 20:57:11 pmYou're embarrassing yourself here with this double-down...
And you've spent too long in another country

https://www.digitaltrends.com/computing/can-email-ever-be-secure/

Would be ambassadors can just skip to the last statement!

Chris Quartly

You think verbally communicating is either accurate or secure either? Clearly conversations have never been overheard or passed on incorrectly. Nothing is perfect, but to suggest ambassadors should verbally communicate is either ignorant, stupid, or just pigheaded... shall we go for a triple-down?
Last.fm playlist of previous 7 days:<br /><br /><br />Q's Comps<br /><br />Some Other Suckers Parade

DavidL

Quote from: Chris Quartly on July 17, 2019, 05:44:54 amYou think verbally communicating is either accurate or secure either? Clearly conversations have never been overheard or passed on incorrectly. Nothing is perfect, but to suggest ambassadors should verbally communicate is either ignorant, stupid, or just pigheaded... shall we go for a triple-down?
Why not.
What I am saying is communicating such views by a method that has been proven to be insecure is, in my opinion, stupid. Clearly that communication could possibly be used to cause mischief by many, including other states.
It was never my intention to suggest all diplomatic communication should be verbal as you seem to suggest.

Chris Quartly

Ok let's invent a new method of completely secure communication, job done! I would contend that verbal communication is less secure, prone to error in replication, especially over time... it's simply a nonsensical argument. 

What exactly are you suggesting? That uncomfortable truths are never actually left on record, or that diplomats don't actually do their job?
Last.fm playlist of previous 7 days:<br /><br /><br />Q's Comps<br /><br />Some Other Suckers Parade

Slim

Well on that last point of contention, I attach no blame to Kim Darroch myself. I would say his comments about Trump were a bit hyperbolic but let's face it, allowing for a bit of rhetorical licence, a pretty fair assessment. But it's his job to offer his opinion whether right or wrong and the fact that it has caused embarrassment is not a problem of his own making.

I don't believe for a moment that Boris' refusal to paint himself into a corner contributed to him resigning. His position had become untenable through no fault of his own and he would have gone either way.

The last of the leadership hustings has now taken place. Both candidates did very well to express themselves and actually while I was quite impressed with Hunt, I thought Boris was inspirational; impassioned, assured and eloquent. And funny.

I think most readers would agree that a banana skin of monumental proportions was needed to deny Boris the job at Number Ten, and it has not manifested itself. The media's Blame Boris game over Kim Darroch hasn't worked. His neighbours' surveillance operations for the Guardian came to nothing. No-one particularly cares what Max Hastings thinks.

And many or most of the party will already have voted by now.

Good times.

DavidL

Quote from: Slim on July 18, 2019, 00:50:17 amI would say his comments about Trump were a bit hyperbolic but let's face it, allowing for a bit of rhetorical licence, a pretty fair assessment. 
I certainly agree with that.

döm

July 18, 2019, 12:53:52 pm #233 Last Edit: July 18, 2019, 13:03:32 pm by döm
Good times for Johnson and his followers.  Bad times ahead for the country.

And his piece de resistance last night about the kipper is complete nonsense.  The regulation he was blaming on the EU was in fact UK law as delivery to the final consumer is not in the remit of the EU.  Complete BS from the BSitter par excellence
You can check out any time you like but you can never leave!

The Letter R

Well the shortest serving PM was what 119 days - I reckon Boris may beat that.....we shall see....

DavidL

Quote from: The Letter R on July 18, 2019, 13:24:01 pmWell the shortest serving PM was what 119 days - I reckon Boris may beat that.....we shall see....
I think you could be right

Chris Quartly

Last.fm playlist of previous 7 days:<br /><br /><br />Q's Comps<br /><br />Some Other Suckers Parade

DavidL

Quote from: döm on July 18, 2019, 12:53:52 pmGood times for Johnson and his followers.  Bad times ahead for the country.

And his piece de resistance last night about the kipper is complete nonsense.  The regulation he was blaming on the EU was in fact UK law as delivery to the final consumer is not in the remit of the EU.  Complete BS from the BSitter par excellence
Yes it seems that Kipper-cooker's fishy tale is a red herring - caught Boris, hook, line and sinker. Obviously Jeremy Hunt supporters.

Slim

Quote from: Chris Quartly on July 18, 2019, 15:14:06 pmSome good news at least https://www.politics.co.uk/blogs/2019/07/18/first-blood-parliament-blocks-boris-johnson-s-plan-to-sideli
That's good news for those who hope to spend their lives snivelling on their obedient little knees, spitting weakly in the faces of millions of ordinary people for their trouble in taking the time to vote in Britain's greatest ever democratic exercise, yes. For the rest of us - pathetic.

So: Boris' ascendance to Britain's top job seems pretty much nailed down now. The votes are in, the announcement will be made tomorrow.

Fascinated to see a number of senior Tories wetting their panties over their party's choice, possibly the most ludicrous example of which is Alan Duncan, who apparently requested to make a statement in the Commons over his resignation.

Reality check: The official, openly stated policy of the current government has been "no deal is better than a bad deal" since 2017. This was enshrined in the Conservative manifesto under which these idiots fought their seats, and became ministers.

Boris' position is exactly the same; no more, no less.

Another reality check: none of these snivelling remainer clowns stood the slightest chance of keeping their jobs under the next Prime Minister, and jumping before they get pushed is simple attention-seeking.

By the way, I'm told Gordon Brown made the observation earlier that more people voted for Ed Balls in Strictly than voted for Boris to become PM. Which is true probably, but has anyone reminded the old boy how many people voted to make him PM in 2007?

Finally - you could be forgiven if this passed you by, but the Lib Dems elected a new leader as well, today. Jo Swinson versus Ed Davey. I think that's what's known as "scraping the barrel". Jo came out on top, by the way.

Nick

I wonder if they will announce a general election date at the same time?
Everybody's got to evalate from the norm.