Author Topic: Brexit watch  (Read 56015 times)

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döm

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Re: Brexit watch
« Reply #2700 on: February 14, 2019, 11:08:26 AM »
Fair point R.  He should have said "we're stockpiling to ensure we have more on our shelves than tin peaches and spam"


Not mine but sums up my feelings on Valentines Day


"Roses are red
Violets are blue
All Brexits are crap
Let's stay in the EU"
You can check out any time you like but you can never leave!

rufus the dawg

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Re: Brexit watch
« Reply #2701 on: February 14, 2019, 12:52:52 PM »
There is Germany ++ option.


Control of borders because not in Schengen.
Send people home if they did not support themselves.
Stay out of the single currency the Euro.
Veto Turkey joining the EU
Veto EU army.
Fresh food and medicines coming in to the country unchecked.
Vote how the UK spends its money.
Have a say in the biggest trade agreements on the planet.
Vote on laws that stops one country getting an unfair advantage in the EU.
Get a 33% rebate.


This is brilliant. Put Germany plus plus on the ballot paper pls. I will turn in to a leaver if I can leave on these terms.

rufus the dawg

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Re: Brexit watch
« Reply #2702 on: February 14, 2019, 16:05:30 PM »
An FT Editorial

Britain will leave the EU on March 29. By then, parliament will have backed Theresa May’s half-baked deal or the nation will fall over the cliff edge. There is nothing to be done but prepare for the worst. The prime minister’s chosen route to Brexit has been paved with deceptions. None has inflicted such misery as this one.

Britain is now being held hostage to Mrs May’s vanity. The departure date, we must believe, is the work of divine providence. The prime minister has been heard say it is her “sacred duty” to meet the deadline. The schedule set out by Article 50 of the Lisbon treaty, they intone, is also inscribed in British law. The country cannot change its mind.

The damage is piling up. Brexit was always going to weaken the economy. A decision to throw up protectionist barriers to trade and investment with Britain’s most important markets could do nothing else. Mrs May’s determination to run down the clock, leaving open the possibility of Britain tumbling out without succour or safety net, has multiplied the costs and dangers.

At stake are the post-Brexit terms of economic exchange not just with the EU27, but also with the dozens of nations that have trade agreements with the EU. Think Japan and Canada, South Korea and Brazil. Large parts of British industry face the prospect of regulatory voids. Companies shipping goods to the other side of the world do not know whether it will be legally possible or economically sensible to unload cargoes scheduled to arrive after March 29. Some businesses are rushing to stockpile essential imported components; others are making plans to shut plants.

Unsurprisingly, the economy is heading towards a wall.

The anxieties spread beyond growth and jobs. The police and security services risk losing access to data about terrorists and criminal gangs. Arrangements for the detention and return of criminal suspects face suspension. British residents in the EU27 have no guarantees as to their rights of residence or access to health and welfare services. Those suffering from chronic illnesses fear that supplies of imported medicines will be disrupted.

This panic has been designed and manufactured in 10 Downing Street to advance the prime minister’s attempt to win support for a settlement with the EU27 already rejected decisively by the House of Commons. As a former head of the civil service, Bob Kerslake, observes, the departure date is a choice rather than act of God. Gus O’Donnell, a former cabinet secretary, adds that the country is hopelessly ill-prepared to leave now.

A chaotic Brexit would be entirely Mrs May’s choice — a decision rooted in stubborn incompetence. Two years ago she set the clock ticking without a plan or strategy. Instead she produced a series of inflexible “red lines” for negotiations and an empty promise of a “bespoke” deal from the EU27. Then she tightened the noose on her own government by embedding in British law the Lisbon treaty’s timetable.

The aim was to court favour among Brexit fundamentalists on the far right of the Tory party. Two years later, Mrs May threatens to handcuff Britain to the wheel as she drives over the cliff. All this because she thinks parliament should change its mind and endorse the flawed settlement she managed finally to negotiate with Brussels.

Half-baked is an overgenerous description of this deal. It throws away what little remains of Britain’s negotiating leverage while leaving unanswered the most basic of questions about its future ties with its own continent — questions about the economy, trade, security and policing, foreign and defence policy.

There has been nothing in Mrs May’s strategy to advance Britain’s interests, to provide protection from the shock of tearing up more than four decades of close co-operation with its neighbours or to maximise any opportunities from a future relationship. The process has instead been about propping up her premiership with a procession of ultimately futile attempts to hold together a divided Tory party.

Some of her officials judge she is bluffing about no-deal. She would never actually detonate the bomb. Mrs May’s chief Brussels negotiator Olly Robbins was this week overheard speculating privately that she will go to “the wire” before, at one minute to midnight, reframing Britain’s choice as one between her deal and an extension of the Article 50 process. This last throw, the calculation runs, might bring into line recalcitrant Tory Brexiters.

Maybe. Other senior officials note the absence during the past two years of the smallest shred of evidence showing the prime minister putting the national interest ahead of political vanity and the futile quest for Tory party unity. Either way, Britain can no longer afford the risk. Parliament must act now to force a suspension or revocation of Article 50.

https://www.ft.com/content/7a7782c8-2f8f-11e9-ba00-0251022932c8

Nick

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Re: Brexit watch
« Reply #2703 on: February 14, 2019, 19:16:22 PM »
The new Swiss trade deal has a quota of 3000 UK work permits..this is what we have done folks, real life impact and end of our free movement.
Everybody's got to evalate from the norm.

DavidL

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Re: Brexit watch
« Reply #2704 on: February 14, 2019, 20:50:08 PM »
https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/uknews/brexit-already-costing-uk-£800m-per-week-bank-of-england-economist-says/ar-BBTA1A6
I see that Mr Vlieghe is a member of the BoE's monetary policy committee which means that he probably has as much skill at predicting the future as Mark Carney. At least when the recession comes it looks as though we'll be in good company. Schadenfreude, I believe they call it! Great news that interest rates will come down if there's a no deal
Brexit!Remoaner click-bait
« Last Edit: February 14, 2019, 21:07:55 PM by DavidL »

rufus the dawg

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Re: Brexit watch
« Reply #2705 on: February 14, 2019, 21:06:26 PM »
Great news that interest rates will come down if there's a no deal Brexit! I see that Mr Vlieghe is a member of the BoE's monetary policy committee which means that he probably has as much skill at predicting the future as Mark Carney. Remoaner click-bait


David, still waiting for your plan!




DavidL

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Re: Brexit watch
« Reply #2706 on: February 14, 2019, 21:12:33 PM »
Airbus are to scrap their flying white elephant. Nothing to do with Brexit of course but the result of a disastrous decision by a consortium of Europeans. Sounds familiar.

rufus the dawg

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Re: Brexit watch
« Reply #2707 on: February 14, 2019, 21:48:42 PM »
Airbus are to scrap their flying white elephant. Nothing to do with Brexit of course but the result of a disastrous decision by a consortium of Europeans. Sounds familiar.


David with my limited knowledge not sure that is correct?



The 747-8 is longer than the a380. BTW the Concorde project was failing until the French came in to help.The British TSR2 failed project eventually turned in to the Tornado a joint project with the West Germans. Then after that the joint project of the Euro fighter which is with Germany, France, Italy and Spain.






« Last Edit: February 14, 2019, 21:56:49 PM by rufus the dawg »

Nick

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Re: Brexit watch
« Reply #2708 on: February 14, 2019, 21:49:50 PM »
Agree this is not Brexit related, but not the fault of Europe either. It was a bad business decision but probably looked a good idea at the time.
Everybody's got to evalate from the norm.

DavidL

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Re: Brexit watch
« Reply #2709 on: February 14, 2019, 22:54:58 PM »

David with my limited knowledge not sure that is correct?

Yes, it is.

DavidL

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Re: Brexit watch
« Reply #2710 on: February 14, 2019, 23:15:48 PM »
Agree this is not Brexit related, but not the fault of Europe either. It was a bad business decision but probably looked a good idea at the time.
Very bad business decision. It was never a good idea. A lot had reservations about Airbus's strategy with the A380 especially when Boeing went in the opposite direction. Airbus backed the wrong horse. I'm sure arrogance and vanity played a large part, again very familiar.

döm

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Re: Brexit watch
« Reply #2711 on: February 15, 2019, 06:59:21 AM »
It was a mistake but Airbus is a hugely successful company that benefits hugely from the single market.


Of much more importance to this thread are the 14000 direct employees of Airbus in the UK and the more than 100,000 indirectly employed that could lose their jobs if it has to move production away from the UK.

You can check out any time you like but you can never leave!

DavidL

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Re: Brexit watch
« Reply #2712 on: February 15, 2019, 07:10:16 AM »


Of much more importance to this thread are the 14000 direct employees of Airbus in the UK and the more than 100,000 indirectly employed that could lose their jobs if it has to move production away from the UK.
Airbus doesn't have to move production from the UK. It would be a choice but would probably be influenced by a desire for the EU to punish the UK for leaving.

The Letter R

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Re: Brexit watch
« Reply #2713 on: February 15, 2019, 08:09:16 AM »
Airbus doesn't have to move production from the UK. It would be a choice but would probably be influenced by a desire for the EU to punish the UK for leaving.


Businesses generally look at the balance sheet David so movement of production for any company would likely be financial - ie avoiding extra needless tariffs on parts, possible delays in the supply chain and any other punitive expenses from whatever Brexit deal we get brings. Companies are out there to make money and appease shareholders not dish out punishments to Countries.







DavidL

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Re: Brexit watch
« Reply #2714 on: February 15, 2019, 10:52:34 AM »

Businesses generally look at the balance sheet David so movement of production for any company would likely be financial - ie avoiding extra needless tariffs on parts, possible delays in the supply chain and any other punitive expenses from whatever Brexit deal we get brings. Companies are out there to make money and appease shareholders not dish out punishments to Countries.
You think that the Eurocrats have not had dialogue with Airbus?
 ;D ;D