Brexit watch

Started by Nick, October 20, 2016, 18:02:39 pm

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NeilP

March 13, 2017, 22:55:42 pm #780 Last Edit: March 13, 2017, 22:57:38 pm by NeilP
Quote from: Nïckslïkk2112 on March 13, 2017, 21:32:40 pm
Occasionally gullible, often faux naif, but the Russkies would have to be a nation of miracle workers to keep fooling enough of the people enough of the time. If the CIA in the mighty USofA couldn't get rid of Castro, what chance a Russian takeover of the world?



I've certainly not mentioned world domination but it's in their interests to destabilise the EU and NATO and perhaps grab a piece of land back, you'd think Ukraine had gas and oil wouldn't you, oh hold on a moment?

DavidL

The Lords have allowed the passage of the A50 bill without amendments. Silly old duffers

Slim

Some of the Lib Dem peers attempted to thwart the people's wishes even after the Commons batted it back. Oxygen thieves.

DavidL

Absolute pleasure to witness a defeated and crumpled Lord Mandleson interviewed on Newsnight. When you hear the arch champagne socialist bleating about a 'hard' Brexit inflicting huge damage on the economy, it's easy to conclude that the opposite is probably true. Euro membership anyone?.....thought not.

döm

Quote from: Slim on March 14, 2017, 00:01:34 am
Some of the Lib Dem peers attempted to thwart the people's wishes even after the Commons batted it back. Oxygen thieves.



"The People"


Millions upon millions of "people" did not vote for this.
Such people deserve representation too. Shame so few representatives turned their backs on those that didn't want this.



You can check out any time you like but you can never leave!

DavidL

Quote from: NeilP on March 13, 2017, 21:15:17 pm

is the the pro remain EU Vodafone who haven't ruled out relocating the London HQ to mainland Europe in the wake of the UK leaving EU?
I think it probably is. Pre-referendum bullshitters.

NeilP

Quote from: DavidL on March 14, 2017, 00:10:49 am
Absolute pleasure to witness a defeated and crumpled Lord Mandleson interviewed on Newsnight. When you hear the arch champagne socialist bleating about a 'hard' Brexit inflicting huge damage on the economy, it's easy to conclude that the opposite is probably true. Euro membership anyone?.....thought not.



the main headlines seem to be about the news up north yesterday rather than what happened in Westminster (no-one was surprised by what happened there) - it rather looks like Scotland's First Minister took a few by surprise ::)

Slim

March 14, 2017, 10:01:19 am #787 Last Edit: March 14, 2017, 10:10:48 am by Slim
Quote from: döm on March 14, 2017, 00:38:00 am

"The People"


Indeed.

Dom, I'm interested to know what sort of representation the losing side normally gets following an election or referendum, in your view? For example following the European Communities membership referendum in 1975, in which millions voted to leave but ultimately lost - what was done to represent them? Which of the EEC's conventions or institutions did we withdraw from, in order to make sure that the millions who rejected the EEC had their voice heard?

Or perhaps you could point to a General Election after which the Tories or Labour slipped in a few of the opposition's manifesto policies, to represent the losers?

Got any examples?

NeilP


Slim

Quote from: NeilP on March 14, 2017, 10:07:04 am
A decent read... the UK Govt is in a particularly strong position after all... yet so glum it seems?


http://www.standard.co.uk/comment/comment/nick-clegg-this-goverment-is-condemned-to-break-its-brexit-promises-a3488336.html


Would be interested to see some actual examples of this supposed glumness? Certainly Corporal Clegg is rather glum at the moment but I rather think the misery he imagines in the government is an artefact of his own wishful thinking.

Matt2112

Quote from: döm on March 14, 2017, 00:38:00 am

"The People"


Millions upon millions of "people" did not vote for this.
Such people deserve representation too. Shame so few representatives turned their backs on those that didn't want this.



But that way surely chaos lies.  There was and is no Brexit-buttery option, nor should there have been and nor should there be in retrospect.


On balance I voted Remain at the time.  The prevailing vote was to leave.  Therefore we leave and that is that.  No-one has been disenfranchised or under-represented.  I honestly don't see what my fellow Remain-voters' problem is.  :-\
The keys to happiness

The Letter R

Quote from: Matt2112 on March 14, 2017, 11:11:18 am

But that way surely chaos lies.  There was and is no Brexit-buttery option, nor should there have been and nor should there be in retrospect.


On balance I voted Remain at the time.  The prevailing vote was to leave.  Therefore we leave and that is that.  No-one has been disenfranchised or under-represented.  I honestly don't see what my fellow Remain-voters' problem is.  :-\





Agreed - just need to get on with the job in hand now and negotiate the best deal for the Country - although everyone will of course disagree with what this actually is.....

döm

Quote from: Slim on March 14, 2017, 10:01:19 am
Indeed.

Dom, I'm interested to know what sort of representation the losing side normally gets following an election or referendum, in your view? For example following the European Communities membership referendum in 1975, in which millions voted to leave but ultimately lost - what was done to represent them? Which of the EEC's conventions or institutions did we withdraw from, in order to make sure that the millions who rejected the EEC had their voice heard?

Or perhaps you could point to a General Election after which the Tories or Labour slipped in a few of the opposition's manifesto policies, to represent the losers?

Got any examples?



Well I know the UK election system is a little skewed but if a party achieved 48% of the vote chances are it would get a fair degree of representation in Parliament.


Personally I don't agree with referenda.  Cameron used the Brexit vote  as a cop out to placate Tory back benchers and the threat from UKIP.  Essentially petty party politics decided the future of the country for decades to come
You can check out any time you like but you can never leave!

döm

Quote from: Matt2112 on March 14, 2017, 11:11:18 am

But that way surely chaos lies.  There was and is no Brexit-buttery option, nor should there have been and nor should there be in retrospect.


On balance I voted Remain at the time.  The prevailing vote was to leave.  Therefore we leave and that is that.  No-one has been disenfranchised or under-represented.  I honestly don't see what my fellow Remain-voters' problem is.  :-\



I can't answer that Matt as I've never heard of Brexit-buttery.  Could you explain it?  Cheers
You can check out any time you like but you can never leave!

döm

Quote from: The Letter R on March 14, 2017, 14:37:41 pm



Agreed - just need to get on with the job in hand now and negotiate the best deal for the Country - although everyone will of course disagree with what this actually is.....



Which Country though?  Looks like hard brexit is putting the future of another union at stake.  As well as the Scottish referendum, calls for a United Ireland are increasing in volume too.
You can check out any time you like but you can never leave!