Are Rush Lazy tourers?

Started by mickpaz2112, June 02, 2015, 04:33:15 am

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DavidL

Quote from: mickpaz2112 on June 03, 2015, 12:02:37 pm
My point in the late 70's , 80's they should have played to a far bigger global audience than they did, they played it too safe.
IMO that 'global audience just didn't exist. They were never U2. Their record sales were not large enough, their popularity not large enough and their desire to change those things not strong enough. To become truly global requires a certain level of commerciality and sustained radio airplay. Rush are a cult band - mainly because their music is just too damn weird for the majority.
I think they've made the most of what popularity they had without much in the way of compromising their artistic integrity. No doubt they could have secured a larger global fanbase but would probably have felt a little uncomfortable playing TSoR to them!

mickpaz2112

June 03, 2015, 14:38:41 pm #16 Last Edit: June 03, 2015, 15:04:34 pm by mickpaz2112
Quote from: DavidL on June 03, 2015, 14:00:48 pm
IMO that 'global audience just didn't exist. They were never U2. Their record sales were not large enough, their popularity not large enough and their desire to change those things not strong enough. To become truly global requires a certain level of commerciality and sustained radio airplay. Rush are a cult band - mainly because their music is just too damn weird for the majority.
I think they've made the most of what popularity they had without much in the way of compromising their artistic integrity. No doubt they could have secured a larger global fanbase but would probably have felt a little uncomfortable playing TSoR to them!
So they played it safe, we call Rush a cult band but they have Global sales of over 35m and that was 1992. Rush did big sell out tours in the UK and US but never tried to expand these areas enough, they sold well in Japan, South America and were released Worldwide. They never played Spain or Italy (until recently), missed out France. I traded for years with people in countries who never got a chance of seeing Rush, but were visited regularly by Purple, Yes, Kiss even Uriah Heep, I just feel they missed a big opportunity.
"Uriah Heep's audience declined by the 1980s, to the point where they became essentially a cult band in the United Kingdom and United States. The band maintains a significant following and performs at arena-sized venues in the Balkans, Germany, Japan, the Netherlands, Russia and Scandinavia. They have sold over 40 million albums worldwide with over 4 million sales in the U.S"
Some people say they've seen angels,
I've seen United,
That's enough.

DavidL

June 03, 2015, 17:07:41 pm #17 Last Edit: June 03, 2015, 23:00:22 pm by DavidL
Quote from: mickpaz2112 on June 03, 2015, 14:38:41 pm
So they played it safe, we call Rush a cult band but they have Global sales of over 35m and that was 1992. Rush did big sell out tours in the UK and US but never tried to expand these areas enough, they sold well in Japan, South America and were released Worldwide. They never played Spain or Italy (until recently), missed out France. I traded for years with people in countries who never got a chance of seeing Rush, but were visited regularly by Purple, Yes, Kiss even Uriah Heep, I just feel they missed a big opportunity.
"Uriah Heep's audience declined by the 1980s, to the point where they became essentially a cult band in the United Kingdom and United States. The band maintains a significant following and performs at arena-sized venues in the Balkans, Germany, Japan, the Netherlands, Russia and Scandinavia. They have sold over 40 million albums worldwide with over 4 million sales in the U.S"
You cannot compare Rush to Purple, Kiss or even Yes. Those three bands have always had far more appeal due to the 'accessible' nature of the music they play (or huge success from the 70s that has endured). Uriah Heep had 'hits' in the 70s but by the 80s had lost their popularity here (possibly due to poor product/outdated style etc). The fact that they can sell out arenas in the Balkans, Russia and Scandanavia is no great shakes because those markets will lap up any western rock act that sees fit to go there. I've absolutely no doubt that Rush could've exploited those markets if they'd wanted but the market they really wanted to crack was the UK because that's where their heroes were from. I guess the fact that they were not prepared to flog themselves in order to rack up a few more million in sales could be termed lazy but it really is 'low hanging fruit' in my book.
Too much can be made of the album sales that Rush have amassed because this is mostly through a rabid (albeit far-reaching) fan base that buys pretty much everything and not through any real 'global' appeal. This is certainly true when considering the much-heralded fact that they are in the top 4 (?) acts in terms of consecutive gold album sales. Sure, Uriah Heep are hard-working and can play to large rock-starved Eastern European audiences but they'd struggle to fill a town hall in the UK.
I prefer the Rush model.

Summerland

Quote from: NeilP on June 03, 2015, 11:01:09 am
I think the best tours ere were pre 83 tbh, but then I'm an oldie


I'm sure you know that I didn't mean that PoW and GuP were the best of times; just that by '88, those 'best' times were in the past. My first gig was ESL in Autumn '81 at Bingley Hall, that's just a quirk of time, but as you note, you're an oldie! :-) Good on yer
-.-- -.-- --..

Valen

Alternatively, by playing it safe perhaps that helped them maintain their longevity?

I dropped off the Rush map after the Signals tour - I know a lot of people enjoyed that show, but for lots of reasons, including a terrible venue, that show didn't do it for me.

As a result I think I missed the HYF and RTB tours (were they the only UK tours between Signals and R30?). Personally I'm glad I rekindled the interest from R30 onwards, when the shows became longer and more varied. I'm happy it's worked out this way for me, rather than seeing shorter sets and more frequent tours earlier in their career and the band burning out.

I'm in the middle of Peart's Far and Away books and I think I can understand his reluctance to tour, and the lengths he (and the others) have to go to stay on top of their game each tour. Yes, it would be great to get a UK R40 tour, but if the guys are truly suffering physically at this stage in their lives, then perhaps the kindest thing is just to "wish them well".

L3rxst

I started my journey with te Exit Stage Left Tour. So wished I could have seen the Hemispheres and Permanent Waves tours, but hey ho.

And the P/G stuff must have been great live, but we all like different parts of this truly progressive band.
I want to believe......

Jonners

as a relative youngster in Rush terms, my first experience was HYF tour in 88, then RTB whenever that was (1992?)  (I cant recall anything about this gig other than the surround sound and inflatable rabbits), then the loooooooong wait for R30.

Then, the only tour I wish I had missed, Snakes and Arrows, which I thought was an awful show, on so many different levels. Managed to convince myself to see them live again on Time Machine, which I am sort of glad I did, then passed on CA which looking back was a mistake due to the large amount of PW, even though I genuinely loath the CA stuff.

I do feel incredibly envious of you fellers who saw ESL etc and even earlier tours for some.

The new songs are an abomination

captainkurtz

Quote from: Jonners on June 04, 2015, 15:47:11 pm
I do feel incredibly envious of you fellers who saw ESL etc and even earlier tours for some.

so do I, but then I remind myself that at least I still have my youth.  Sort of.  ;D
Anger is a gift.

Matt2112

Like Jonners, 1988 was my first time.  Nothing has surpassed it since, and given all the songs, synths, lighting, lasers and mullets of the HYF tour, I'm confident nothing that came before it did either.  8)
The keys to happiness

DavidL

Quote from: Valen on June 04, 2015, 08:45:25 am
Alternatively, by playing it safe perhaps that helped them maintain their longevity?

I'm sure that's the case.

Nick

Are their fans lazy tourists?
Everybody's got to evalate from the norm.

Nïckslïkk2112

Quote from: Nick on June 04, 2015, 18:35:24 pm
Are their fans lazy tourists?

Wish I had been on the S&A tour...
Legend in my own Mind


Jonners

Quote from: Nïckslïkk2112 on June 04, 2015, 21:44:49 pm
Wish I had been on the S&A tour...

Me too, and I only travelled 10 miles to the NEC!

The new songs are an abomination

Richard_2112

Interesting topic. Look back at the Rio dvd and you get an idea that they really didn't understand where their biggest audiences were until it was (arguably) too late. IMHO I think they would have gone down a storm in Japan, and might even have ventured out there to see them.

My first experience of Rush was road crewing with 2112 in 2003 who played pretty much all of my favourite period of the band, and their shows were pretty much better than the real thing. Been on multiple shows on every tour since R30 though (trying to make up for the fact I was only 4 years old when they toured with Roll The Bones) But looking back on all the live albums I really wished I'd seen them on the Hold Your Fire tour, but alas I was only a couple of months old when that happened...
Over thinking, over analyzing separates the body from the mind. Withering my intuition, missing opportunities and I must feed my will to feel my moment drawing way outside the lines.

Nïckslïkk2112

Quote from: Richard_2112 on June 05, 2015, 20:25:06 pm
But looking back on all the live albums I really wished I'd seen them on the Hold Your Fire tour, but alas I was only a couple of months old when that happened...

Gosh, that was such wishy-washy tour. Alas I was 25 years old when it happened. I'd been touched by cynicism and incipient curmudgeonliness by then. Thank heavens I'd seen them in the 70s...

I don't think Rush are that lazy tourers, it's just that Raymond Danniel$ likes to maximise his returns with respect to effort. Back in the 80s and into the 90s the best touring infrastructure was in North America and Yurp.
Legend in my own Mind