What's in/on Your DVD/VCR/PVR etc #17

Started by Dixkot, September 30, 2013, 11:50:06 am

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DavidL

I find it rather ironic that Netflix are responsible for this given that Harry and Meghan have chosen Netflix to bankroll their 'new life'. I'm sure they do have principles.....somewhere

Reg

Just started on Star Trek : Discovery.
Standing in the shadows, hiding from the light<br />Reach out in the darkness, and hold on for your life<br />All the fear of the future, all the emptiness inside<br />When the moment of truth arrives, hey, you can run but you can't hide

döm

Just watched the Michael Fagan episode of The Crown. I thought it was a bit excessive to devote a whole episode to it but it was very well done. A bit Ken Loach at times but there's no harm in that.
When the truth offends we lie and lie until we can longer remember it is even there. But it is still there. Every lie we tell incurs a debt to the truth. Sooner or later, that debt is repaid

Jonners

Yep, just watched that myself.
Good episode, I was expecting it to be literally just him, but the context of teh episode was very well done
The new songs are an abomination

Straight Shooter

Queen - Live at the Rainbow '74

(Recorded from Sky Arts, now also on Freeview)

This coming Saturday morning at 2.45, sees Nick Mason's Saucerful of Secrets at the Roundhouse getting an airing. Set your controls...
"I mean...unbelievable, you're a walking encyclopaedia!" : Rick Wakeman - Planet Rock's 'Tune-Adversity Challenge' 2007.

Nïckslïkk2112

Quote from: Straight Shooter on November 27, 2020, 00:44:32 amThis coming Saturday morning at 2.45, sees Nick Mason's Saucerful of Secrets at the Roundhouse getting an airing. Set your controls...
Recorded it already.
It was on last Saturday, after Floyd's Delicate Sound of Thunder :)
Legend in my own Mind<br /><br />

Not enough war
Not enough famine
Not enough suffering
Not enough natural selection

pxr5

Not watching much at the moment. I'm half way through the latest series of Fargo, but with Strictly and I'm a Celeb on there isn't much time for anything else (not me btw, the missus). I'm using the time to sort my music out properly.

Matt2112

November 29, 2020, 12:21:34 pm #2587 Last Edit: November 29, 2020, 12:27:01 pm by Matt2112
Roma

Alfonso Cuarón's semi-autobiographical film for which he won his second Best Director Oscar, amongst a truck-load of other awards.

Shot in pristine black-and-white, ingenuously lit and embellished with seamless CGI, the story focusses on the housekeeper of a well-to-do Mexican family, who dotes on the children and is adored  in return.

Its 135 minutes go by at a gradual pace, and after wondering what the point of the film was for 20 minutes or so, it slowly drew me in, culminating in a quite extraordinary last half hour or so that contain two utterly unforgettable scenes; one which is almost unbearably harrowing (and will very likely be unwatchable for those who have suffered what is unflinchingly and graphically depicted) and another literally breathtaking scene of the how-they-hell-did-they-shoot-that?! school (there are substantial documentaries in the extras I've yet to watch, but must).

Cuaron's technical achievements in this film are on a similar level as demonstrated in his previous film Gravity, and emphatically show that he is a complete master of his craft.

By the end, I was quietly stunned.
The keys to happiness

DavidL

Watched another episode of 'Brian Johnson's A Life On The Road'. This week featuring Gordon Sting. Followed that with another Sky Arts show, Icon: Music Through The Lens. Episode about magazine cover photography.

Nick

Quote from: Matt2112 on November 05, 2020, 23:55:20 pmJojo Rabbit

This had a mixed critical reception on release, which wasn't surprising given it's quite a dark but very wry and quirky tragi-comedy about a Hitler Youth member with Hitler as his (quite camp) imaginary mentor, and who strikes up a relationship with a teenage Jewish girl being hidden in the house by his mother.

Director/writer/producer (and performer of the Hitler character) Taika Waititi shows remarkable audacity in somehow managing tonal shifts where Nazi Germany is wrung for laughs in one sequence and has its horrors depicted in another.

However, my initial reservations both about how this premise could possibly work and Waititi's idiosyncratic humour (seen also in Thor: Ragnarok) where soon worn away by a combination of an extremely deft and well-pitched script (which won the 2020 Oscar and BAFTA for Best Adapted Screenplay), impressive performances from the young leads  and solid support from Scarlett Johansson and Sam Rockwell, amongst other familiar faces.

It may not appeal to everyone but I'll count myself among those it won over; so I'd say it's well worth a go.
Watched this today and also enjoyed it.
Everybody's got to evalate from the norm.

DavidL

Today at 08:53:23 #2590 Last Edit: Today at 08:55:07 by DavidL
I watched a documentary on the other Canadian three-piece last night - Triumph. I've never bought any of their records and only know the songs that are on rotation with the likes of Planet Rock. I always considered them a bit naff, tbh. They were known for a spectacular stage show but I never really saw the proof of that ( the Triumph sign made from bulbs that they used as a backdrop was particularly duff, IMHO). I saw them once, at the Heavy Metal Holocaust at Port Vale. Competent but     nothing special ( the best Canadian that day was Marino...obvs)
The band have a decent story to tell though. They did sell some records and write some strong tunes, melodic hard rock I'd call it. What did for them in the end was guitarist Rik Emmett leaving due to the other two sticking rigidly to the format. I wonder if he felt envious of friend, Alex Lifeson's, opportunity to develop many styles over the course of his career within the confines of Rush. For Rik, it seems Triumph just weren't musically ambitious enough.
Anyway, it ended very acrimoniously with court cases etc. Rik reduced to tears during the interview - shame. I think he suffered a little from 'new boy' syndrome as the other two were partners and friends in the band before he joined. I think it's almost impossible to get over that, however long the band is together. Steve Perry of Journey suffered with it and I think, to a small extent Neil Peart did too

döm

Sounds interesting David where did you catch that?  I only bought one of their albums back in the day (I think I went for it as they were also a Canadian 3 piece) - Never Surrender which is a decent effort.
When the truth offends we lie and lie until we can longer remember it is even there. But it is still there. Every lie we tell incurs a debt to the truth. Sooner or later, that debt is repaid

DavidL

Quote from: döm on Today at 10:53:08Sounds interesting David where did you catch that?  I only bought one of their albums back in the day (I think I went for it as they were also a Canadian 3 piece) - Never Surrender which is a decent effort.
It's on YouTube. It's available in 5(?) parts, each around 10 mins long. If you just search for Triumph (band) you should find it. 
I think the albums to go for (from my limited knowledge) would be 'Just A Game' and 'Progressions Of Power'

Jonners

The Crown-Series 4.

Finished, bhinged, enjoyed
The new songs are an abomination

Straight Shooter

Quote from: DavidL on Today at 11:21:05I think the albums to go for (from my limited knowledge) would be 'Just A Game' and 'Progressions Of Power'
Dom - I haven't heard all their records but Allied Forces has always been a favourite album of mine, in general; I only have that and Just A Game (great title track).

Reg likes his Triumph - he'll be able to recommend better than myself  :)
"I mean...unbelievable, you're a walking encyclopaedia!" : Rick Wakeman - Planet Rock's 'Tune-Adversity Challenge' 2007.