We have way too much music to play....

Started by Stephen, June 12, 2013, 14:57:22 pm

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Stephen

In between the London and Sheffield shows, which I enjoyed with my teenage sons, we went to see Fish in Milton Keynes in front of 300 people.

While I do understand that Rush value their musicianship above all else , there is I believe scope for a modicum more verbal interaction with the audience. This was brought starkly into relief by Fish's usual shenanigans.

Whilst I wouldn't expect to see a five minute monologue, just a little more acknowledgement of the crowd would engage, enthuse and get fans off their feet more than is currently the case.

At Sheffiield, about fifty fans held up small sheets proclaiming 'blah' - even a raised eyebrow from Geddy would have been welcome.

I know this is a common gripe, but without such interactions, gigs can merely become carbon copy representations - facsimiles of that autumn released DVD in effect.

These days there is more interaction at orchestral concerts I attend than is evident with the Canadian trio.

I don't want much, just an acknowledgement that I'm there.

Stephen

Stuart B

Interestingly when my wife went to the Time Machine gig in Glasgow, she commented on how little interaction there was with the fans and the band and she felt this left a big gap

JonL

I'd rather have an extra song than 5 minutes of waffle.
Neil young spoke once on Monday night.

Francis Dunnery on the other hand talks far to much astro bollocks at his shows.
The lenses inside of me that paint the world black. The pools of poison, the scarlet mist, that spill over into rage.

zoony

Quote from: JonL on June 12, 2013, 16:32:28 pm
I'd rather have an extra song than 5 minutes of waffle.



Exactly mate. You can't really ask for mch more from three blokes of their age than 2 and a half hours plus of stonking material and musicianship.

3rdday

I enjoyed both Rush gigs that I went to on this tour immensely, but I know what you mean. It doesn't have to be much, but just a few more words with a little bit of variation (even from one tour to the next) and some attempt at spontaneity would be nice.

Mind you, if the one Eric Clapton gig that I've been to is anything to go by, Geddy is really talkative compared to him. Just "thank you" after each song and nothing at all at the end of a brief encore. Looked like he couldn't wait to get the concert over with and get out of there. (Yes, even more than Mr Peart does.)


Nïckslïkk2112

Aye. Be nice to get an Akerfeldt style "Shut the feck Up" from Ged as I stand there shouting "Old Rush Good, New Rush Bad" at him :)
Legend in my own Mind


Matt2112

Quote from: Stephen on June 12, 2013, 14:57:22 pm
At Sheffiield, about fifty fans held up small sheets proclaiming 'blah' - even a raised eyebrow from Geddy would have been welcome.

I know this is a common gripe, but without such interactions, gigs can merely become carbon copy representations - facsimiles of that autumn released DVD in effect.

These days there is more interaction at orchestral concerts I attend than is evident with the Canadian trio.

I don't want much, just an acknowledgement that I'm there.

Stephen


I take these points, but...I seem to remember at Sheffield, the first song after the mass display of BLAH placards while Ged spoke was Grand Designs; as Alex hit the first group of three chords during the intro I noticed him clearly mouthing, "Blah Blah Blah" in time to the music in the general direction of the placard wavers.  So the gesture didn't go completely ignored.  :)

The keys to happiness

Stephen

Quote from: Nick Sims on June 13, 2013, 00:25:41 am
Aye. Be nice to get an Akerfeldt style "Shut the feck Up" from Ged as I stand there shouting "Old Rush Good, New Rush Bad" at him :)


That would be an 'interaction' Nick. 

I'd think about paying to see that.   8)

Slim

I completely agree, Stephen. They do seem to put a lot of energy into the shows but there's something perfunctory about a Rush show, perhaps even a sense that they're "getting through it" as much as anything. I was pleased to hear that Geddy's shtick at Sheffield was slightly different than in Manchester but it only amounted to a few words. Part of it is, as you say, that Arena venues emphasise the divide between band and audience which is figuratively as well as literally wider.

But actually even at Newcastle City Hall back in their heyday, Geddy never departed very far from the script. He isn't a natural frontman. I suspect that he doesn't feel at home expressing himself to a crowd; not verbally anyway. You'll have noticed I'm sure that on the ancient footage of the band playing with John Rutsey, it's John who introduces the songs and chats to the audience. That's a pretty unusual situation.

Paul Sheehan

Quote from: Stephen on June 12, 2013, 14:57:22 pm
In between the London and Sheffield shows, which I enjoyed with my teenage sons, we went to see Fish in Milton Keynes in front of 300 people.



I was there too. Great show. The story about his grandfather digging the trench through the fresh graveyard at the Somme in WW1 stayed with me for days.
"Yes, actually my Dad's name was Billy Sheehan"