Author Topic: The Pudders Periodical  (Read 46441 times)

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Nïckslïkk2112

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Re: The Pudders Periodical
« Reply #570 on: February 22, 2011, 19:49:43 PM »
Glad you enjoyed Buxton Opera House :)
I went to see Hawkwind there once - most incongruous!
Legend in my own Mind


Pudders

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Re: The Pudders Periodical
« Reply #571 on: May 09, 2011, 22:10:17 PM »
Late with reviews - can't see me being arsed at the moment which is maybe a shame?

In summary:

Peter Frampton - Brilliant!

Blackfield - Brilliant!

Bernie Marsden - Pretty good!

Anyway - life is mostly a very unfair pile of doggy poo at the moment - as a result I am an incredibly grumpy tosser. Sorry about that, you'll just have to put up with it.

That is all......

BasspedalMan

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Re: The Pudders Periodical
« Reply #572 on: May 09, 2011, 23:09:16 PM »
Awwww gis' a hug fella x
Ok, I'll join in...

1981 x 1
1983 x 4
1988 x 2
1992 x 2
1996 x 2
1997 x 5
2002 x 3
2004 x 7
2007 x 7
2011 x 3
2013 x 3

Pudders

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Re: The Pudders Periodical
« Reply #573 on: May 17, 2011, 08:56:03 AM »
Busy day yesterday:

Took a half day off and headed up to town mid afternoon. Popped over to the Tower Hill Memorial to Merchant Seamen and Trawlermen lost in the World Wars as I wanted to get some photos if possible of a couple of names of men who were at St John's (the school I work at) for my next project! I'd written the names down on a scrap of paper but had assumed they would be in alphabetical order, or that their would be a register to look up....wrong! they are listed by ship, and there are thousands of names!! After an initial forlorn attempt to just 'find' them (I was sure one of the ships was something like 'Citano' ::) ) I resorted to trying to log on to the CWGC website via the phone - but it was taking for ever so I gave up and headed out of the Memorial. As I did so I turned back and there, straight in front of me, was one of the names - under a ship named the 'Gitano' - oh well I was close! Even more remarkably about twenty names higher was the other name! So, mission accomplished!

Next port of call was the Old Bank of England pub in Fleet Street - a Fullers hostelry and one of my favourites in London - I used to frequent it when I was researching my family history at the nearby Public Records Office in Chancery Lane and the Births, Marriages and Deaths at St Catherines House in The Aldwych. I was meeting a couple of ladies from Australia to whom I may or may not be related - through my convict 3xGreat Grandfather. It's very doubtful to be honest but, as they were in the UK it seemed a good idea to meet up and they were great company. As they headed off to meet someone else for the evening I set off again this time up to Kings Cross for the pre-Riverside gig meet up. Joined Mark, Oz, Bez, Jon and his mate and also Reg - and my old mucker Greg who I hadn't seen for ages - despite the fact he lives just up the road from me! He was the keyboard player in the very first band I was in, at Agricultural College, back in 1981, knew nothing about Riverside but likes his prog so I figured he was good bet for the spare ticket. As usual we put the world to rights, had a drink or two, discussed the worrying news that ARH was now attending the O2 gig and discovered that I was being put forward as an 'expert' on WW1 Battlefields to the offspring of various members of tnms, their families and friends!

The gig itself was very good. We found ourselves a spot just left of central as the support act was still playing - then drifted a bit more as people milled about at the end of their set. By the time Riverside came on it was pretty packed and I once again won the 'pair of drunken nutty fans stand next to you' prize. In fairness they were slightly behind me as well and I wasn't that bothered, though my elbow did stray a couple of times when they got over boisterous (those Poles know how to have good time eh?), but I imagine they were driving Jon and his mate nuts as they were stood in front of them.... I thought the sound was only ok to start and it took a while to get sorted  - the drums and guitar were really low to start with - but once it was sorted it was really good. Lots of familiar stuff plus two new tracks of which the second, played in the encore, was top quality. Tried fiddling with the settings on the camera last night which meant most pictures came out crap - but I'll have another look later and see what if anything is worth posting....

Easy journey back down to Waterloo and home with Greg - finally having the chance to have a good chin wag - and home about 12.30.

Good day all round!

Analog RH

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Re: The Pudders Periodical
« Reply #574 on: May 17, 2011, 10:32:28 AM »
As usual we put the world to rights, had a drink or two, discussed the worrying news that ARH was now attending the O2 gig ........

...... I'm only coming down to give Bez some grief y'know .........


Pudders

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Re: The Pudders Periodical
« Reply #575 on: May 17, 2011, 10:51:36 AM »


Only one worth posting really.....

Pudders

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Re: The Pudders Periodical
« Reply #576 on: July 19, 2011, 00:20:57 AM »
Foncquevillers Military Cemetery. The Somme, 15th July 2011, 95 years and two weeks after the Battle began.....now peaceful and idyllic.



Remember..........

Pudders

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Re: The Pudders Periodical
« Reply #577 on: August 02, 2011, 00:57:09 AM »
Foncquevillers Military Cemetery. The Somme, 15th July 2011, 95 years and two weeks after the Battle began.....now peaceful and idyllic.



Remember..........

Wow, what a great picture......forgotten I'd posted that!

So, been a while since I've updated in here - not really had the urge to do the gig reviews etc as life has become quite focused on Lou as she has had a difficult couple of months. Now though she is in Lanzarote - where the boys and I will join her on Thursday - and she's feeling a whole lot better! It will be two weeks we've been apart and I can't wait to get out there......

Anyway, a quick summary of the last few weeks: Part One!

The weekend away in France was great. Neil (Head of History at School) and I managed to get an early boat which meant we were at Fromelles, near Lille, by 3pm on the Friday. This is the new War Graves Cemetery built after the discovery of mass graves nearby - interesting to see but felt strangely detached, perhaps it was just the 'newness'? From there we moved down to Foncquevillers Military Cemetery, (see photo above) at the far north of the Somme battlefield. A place probably not visited much but as so often it was a beautiful setting, set off by the glorious weather, as we searched for and found one of the former pupils of the School. Standing there, in front of his grave, reading the description of how he died in the regimental history was very powerful and quite moving - and it was almost 95 years to the day that he died as well. From there we headed down towards our B&B for the night - Avril Williams place at Auchonvillers, a legend in it's own full-English breakfast! After a cracking evening meal we walked around to the local War Graves Cemetery and said hello to another former pupil, also killed on the first day of the Somme, attacking the famous Hawthorn Ridge. It inspired us to walk the support trench lines to just behind the frontline as-was that day which, with dusk fast approaching and a full moon was quite spectacular and again moving.

Day two was fairly straightforward - we had work to do, collecting info for worksheets at Newfoundland Park and at Thiepval Memorial before moving up to The Woods - High Wood and Delville wood - both scenes of prolonged and horrendous fighting in the weeks and months following that disastrous first day. Delville is an awesome place - it just 'feels' so sad and walking though the wood today I always feel uncomfortable, recalling the fighting that took place here. High Wood was famously described by the late great Richard Holmes as, "Ghastly by day, ghostly by night, the rottenest place on the Somme", and with reason. More former pupils lie here - some are just names on Thiepval, their bodies never being identified........lost in the mud and confusion of battle, lost in the Hell they called High Wood.....

That evening we had a long and interesting chat with Avril and a couple of other guests back at the B&B - the wine flowed! - before hitting the sack and sleeping soundly........

Next day Avril showed us around her cellar - a Stretcher Bearers post during the Somme - and I had one of those occasional 'moments' which I won't bore you with but was very real! We were heading home that day but wanted to pay a couple of visits on the way back. First stop was at Vimy Ridge - the Canadian memorial ther dominates the surrounding countryside - where we wanted to check out the tunnels. Sadly only half of the route was open due to flooding but it was interesting nevertheless - though not as good as the Wellington Tunnels in Arras. From there we moved onto the French National Memorial at Notre Dame de Lorette. Another amazing place - over 40,000 graves, a chapel and an Ossuary containing the coffins of unknown French soldiers who died in the various conflicts the nation had been involved in.

All in all a really enjoyable and thought provoking trip - and looking forward to returning with Neilp in September.

Need to upload some more photos - will do that some other time......

Fuzzface

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Re: The Pudders Periodical
« Reply #578 on: August 18, 2011, 10:21:57 AM »
Next port of call was the Old Bank of England pub in Fleet Street - a Fullers hostelry and one of my favourites in London

I've been twice at a pub called The Old Bell, which is also on Fleet Street. Very nice old pub. I seem to remember they had built the pub about 300 years ago, for the constructors that were rebuilding a nearby church after a fire...  :)

Here it is:

Pudders

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Re: The Pudders Periodical
« Reply #579 on: August 23, 2011, 00:00:32 AM »
I've been twice at a pub called The Old Bell, which is also on Fleet Street. Very nice old pub. I seem to remember they had built the pub about 300 years ago, for the constructors that were rebuilding a nearby church after a fire...  :)

Here it is:


I've seen that one - never been in mind - there are some great pubs hidden away in London :)

Pudders

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Re: The Pudders Periodical
« Reply #580 on: February 10, 2013, 22:47:35 PM »
God it's dusty in here....................

Just quietly making a record of the fact that in a weeks time I am off to Poland for four days with the school with the main object of the trip being a visit to Auschwitz. I went there when I was at school in 1979 but this will be......different.

Staying in Krakow which I remember as a beautiful city, lets see!

Pudders

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Re: The Pudders Periodical
« Reply #581 on: February 22, 2013, 20:11:01 PM »
I can't put many pictures up as most have our pupils in them, and it's not exactly holiday snaps either. Here are a few anyway......



The iconic view of the entrance to Birkenau, taken from The Ramp.



Taken form the top of the steps down into the undressing area of Crematorium (and Gas Chamber) 3. Stood here a while..............



Looking across towards the actual Gas chamber (far side) of Crematorium 3 - the previous picture taken from far left. Average of about 1000 people on a transport of which at it's height 75% went straight to their deaths. This and Number 2 could take 2000 at one time, murder on a truly industrial scale.