Guitarists - Post Pics/details of your gear

Started by Stewart, May 15, 2005, 00:03:59 am

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Slim

Looks like a Supro. If you really like it and are going to make the commitment, it's not a bad choice. But I'd always recommend high bang-for-buck guitars for a beginner - a Classic Vibe Tele or Strat, a PRS SE, one of the budget Ibanez models. Super quality for not a lot of money.
Lies run sprints, but the truth runs marathons.

Matt2112

Quote from: Slim on August 19, 2019, 23:40:53 pmLooks like a Supro. If you really like it and are going to make the commitment, it's not a bad choice. But I'd always recommend high bang-for-buck guitars for a beginner - a Classic Vibe Tele or Strat, a PRS SE, one of the budget Ibanez models. Super quality for not a lot of money.

Yes, I'd add a Yamaha Pacifica 112 to that list; remarkable for the price.
The keys to happiness

Slim

Treated myself again. Bit annoyed when it arrived (from Andertons) because the fingerboard was very dry, the frets were dull and the strings were actually scraping on the frets on a string bend (yuck).

But conditioning a fingerboard and polishing frets is good for the soul. Very therapeutic and the difference it made was remarkable; the fingerboard (interestingly laurel, not rosewood) has come up a treat.

Always fancied a pink Strat. This is actually a Classic Vibe, made in Indonesia but the quality is not far behind a modern US Strat (and decidedly better than some of the older ones I've had). I already have a Classic Vibe Tele so I knew it would be pretty good.

Next job - on with a set of 10-46.

Lies run sprints, but the truth runs marathons.

Matt2112

Oh I love that colour, James, and a striking looking guitar all over.  Very nice indeed.

I keep looking at a Mexican Charvel So Cal in buttercream blonde; looks like a modded Strat at first glance, and in fact the headstock is licensed from Fender. Unfortunately, with times as they are, it's difficult to justify its purchase to anyone but myself.  ::) :)
The keys to happiness

Slim

June 07, 2020, 12:40:15 pm #334 Last Edit: June 07, 2020, 12:51:32 pm by Slim
Cheers Matt. Cosmetically it's a lovely guitar. Some observations: the frets are supposed to be "narrow tall" according to the spec on the Andertons site but they aren't; they are emphatically vintage style, small frets. It does play nicely though and it reminds of me of my old '82 JV Strat before I had it refretted, which is nice.

Interesting that there's a skunk stripe, as an original early '60s Strat wouldn't have had this. But of course it's not intended as an exact reproduction of an early '60s instrument, hence the (very welcome) truss rod adjustment at the headstock end. I hate having to take off a neck just to adjust the truss rod tension.

Was going to take another pic with the strings on, but I was lazy and 'shopped them on instead.

Lies run sprints, but the truth runs marathons.

Gary L. Grape

I bought myself one of these last week, it's fun to play around with, even though it can be a bit dodgy sometimes. I think it might very well come in handy soon. And one of the sounds gives me a really strong Jamiroquai feel

Anna Woriboutchu

Quote from: Slim on June 04, 2020, 21:15:54 pmTreated myself again. Bit annoyed when it arrived (from Andertons) because the fingerboard was very dry, the frets were dull and the strings were actually scraping on the frets on a string bend (yuck).

But conditioning a fingerboard and polishing frets is good for the soul. Very therapeutic and the difference it made was remarkable; the fingerboard (interestingly laurel, not rosewood) has come up a treat.

Always fancied a pink Strat. This is actually a Classic Vibe, made in Indonesia but the quality is not far behind a modern US Strat (and decidedly better than some of the older ones I've had). I already have a Classic Vibe Tele so I knew it would be pretty good.

Next job - on with a set of 10-46.


Much more courageous than me with regards to maintenance. The lockdown forced me into a truss rod adjustment for my Geddy Lee Jazz bass. It was carried out in a moment of madness brought about by loneliness and alcohol abuse and fortunately worked out ok.

Slim

Did you have to take the neck off? I hate that about old-style Fenders.

One of my favourite Strats is a Japanese '60s type, acquired second-hand and well used a few years ago (it had picked up a few dings and a refret). The neck was too straight, even with all the tension out of the truss rod. I put two blocks of wood under the strings and overtightened them, then left it in my loft for a few months. Now there's a bit of relief in the neck and it plays nicely with a bit of tension in the truss rod.
Lies run sprints, but the truth runs marathons.

Slim

Have you ever found yourself thinking: "if only Fender made a thinline Tele .. but with Jazzmaster pickups"?

Neither have I, but when I saw a demo of this one on the Andertons YouTube channel, I'd clicked on the "add to cart" button about 30 seconds in.

This is actually a Squier 'Classic Vibe'. I have a penchant for moderately inexpensive guitars of Far Eastern origin, and Classic Vibes are right in that sweet spot where impulse purchases that don't make your debit card wince can land instruments of thoroughly decent quality.




There are two Classic Vibe manufacturing locations that I'm aware of, in China and Indonesia. My two Teles are Chinese and the construction quality is definitely higher than the Strat, which is from Indonesia. The frets are nicely finished and polished, the finish is mirror smooth and the attention to detail is pretty much impeccable - the Strat has one or two minor finish flaws, I had to polish the frets myself and a couple of the pickguard screws are slightly mis-angled. Picky I know (pun not intended).

I especially love the untinted neck finish on this one - it gives it a modern look and feel, as does the 22nd fret overhang like a US Std.

It doesn't sound like a Tele - the neck pickup is a little dark, and they're both quite powerful. But they respond quite nicely to tweaking the volume knob down. You definitely get a little bit of the Thinline resonance through the amp.

The neck arrived absolutely straight with 9s on, no relief at all. Despite that it does play nicely, but it will have 10s on soon.

I'm not fond of the traditional Fender bent steel saddles and I may swap them out for solid ones. But they work fine. The tuners are nice and smooth in operation.

And there's a lovely woody smell down the F Hole.
Lies run sprints, but the truth runs marathons.

Matt2112

Teles aren't really my thing, but there's no denying that's a fine looking instrument and I love the bold colours.  Very nice indeed.
The keys to happiness

Slim

I think you sort of age into them .. I always thought of them as a sort of awkward stepbrother to the Stratocaster but the simplicity appeals to me now.
Lies run sprints, but the truth runs marathons.

Anna Woriboutchu

Quote from: Slim on September 22, 2020, 08:32:12 amDid you have to take the neck off? I hate that about old-style Fenders.

One of my favourite Strats is a Japanese '60s type, acquired second-hand and well used a few years ago (it had picked up a few dings and a refret). The neck was too straight, even with all the tension out of the truss rod. I put two blocks of wood under the strings and overtightened them, then left it in my loft for a few months. Now there's a bit of relief in the neck and it plays nicely with a bit of tension in the truss rod.
Sorry, I missed this until now. Yes, I had to remove the neck and have to say it was a nerve-wracking experience. I had this horrible feeling in the pit of my stomach when my pride and joy was lying there in bits that something would go wrong when I tried to reassemble, but everything went to plan (or rather my lack of). I get the distinct impression though that this could only be done successfully a couple of times before screw holes get a bit tired and worn and parts would eventually not align properly or tightly enough. Seems a really stupid way to build a guitar these days when there are far better options.

Slim

Quote from: Anna Woriboutchu on October 03, 2020, 22:47:08 pmSorry, I missed this until now. Yes, I had to remove the neck and have to say it was a nerve-wracking experience. I had this horrible feeling in the pit of my stomach when my pride and joy was lying there in bits that something would go wrong when I tried to reassemble, but everything went to plan (or rather my lack of). I get the distinct impression though that this could only be done successfully a couple of times before screw holes get a bit tired and worn and parts would eventually not align properly or tightly enough. Seems a really stupid way to build a guitar these days when there are far better options.

I understand that feeling but I've had the neck off one of my Strats 9 or 10 times, and it hasn't suffered so far. The important thing is not to overtighten. Just needs to be snug, and the neck won't move.
Lies run sprints, but the truth runs marathons.

Anna Woriboutchu