Author Topic: The experience of a book  (Read 9355 times)

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Redbecg

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Re: The experience of a book
« Reply #30 on: June 23, 2009, 19:42:30 PM »
I use Project Gutenberg to download PDFs of most books, then use the Stanza app on the iphone to read. You can control the font size, orientation and spacing, so makes for a fairly decent read.

However, I still firmly sit in the physical form of a book, camp. It will take something extraordinary for me to abandon the book. And yes, I'm biased. ;)

Reg

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Re: The experience of a book
« Reply #31 on: June 24, 2009, 17:17:33 PM »
I use Project Gutenberg to download PDFs of most books
I did that with a load of Edgar Rice Burroughs books.
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Slim

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Re: The experience of a book
« Reply #32 on: July 29, 2010, 20:12:58 PM »
I don't think electronic books will ever dominate the market or replace print media entirely - for the same reason I don't think this will happen with music, movies, games or other media.

Apart from there being far too much money tied up in the manufacture & retail of "hard" product - the bottom line is that people like things - tangible solid objects they can hold & touch & look at. That's part of the essence of materialism.

Jon.

Well, I was reminded of our discussion here, in which I predicted the death of the paper book, on reading this BBC news item tonight:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-10786882

"In the last 30 days, Amazon has sold 180 Kindle books for every 100 hardcover books."

The old-fashioned book isn't dead yet, but it's coming.

Nïckslïkk2112

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Re: The experience of a book
« Reply #33 on: July 29, 2010, 20:54:21 PM »
Well, I was reminded of our discussion here, in which I predicted the death of the paper book, on reading this BBC news item tonight:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-10786882

"In the last 30 days, Amazon has sold 180 Kindle books for every 100 hardcover books."

The old-fashioned book isn't dead yet, but it's coming.
Not while I'm still living it's not! Old Books Good, New Technology Bad!
Anyhoo, that statistic quotes hardcover books, what about when you include soft cover books?
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Slim

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Re: The experience of a book
« Reply #34 on: July 30, 2010, 09:19:19 AM »
Yes, hard cover isn't the same as hard copy. All the same it's a telling statistic. The end of the hardware book is nigh.

Avalon

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Re: The experience of a book
« Reply #35 on: August 30, 2010, 21:56:07 PM »
Imagine if books came after games:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lpet4TJi41A
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Nance

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Re: The experience of a book
« Reply #36 on: November 03, 2010, 20:56:54 PM »
I have inherited a love of books from my mother and it is to do with the smell and feel and memories that certain books bring.  I love rubbing pages between my fingers to feel the quality of the paper. I have acquired books from all over, charity shops, car boots and even real book shops!
We have been in our current house about 13 years and I have still have boxes of books waiting to be unpacked.
I also keep my books by author or genre!!  Anyone else do that.

Real books will continue but perhaps as a unexpected find in a shop. Just like when we find a 'record shop' still sells vinyl !! yipee
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Captain Ron

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Re: The experience of a book
« Reply #37 on: November 15, 2010, 22:17:29 PM »
What is needed for the ebook to dominate is an ereader with a similar ergonomic feel to an actual book. Reproducing the FEEL of a book is vital. Not a screen or a tablet. It would have a nice soft touch worn leatherback cover and say four to five pages which you physically turn like a real book. These are flexable, soft to the touch like paper, ideally the device is fully waterproof to cope with accidental submersion during bathtime reading or to allow cleaning with a soft damp cloth. The pages will bend but not tear and are actively updateable but with no power required to maintain the image, only to refresh it. Like ePaper(TM).

In my proposed ebook reader which I shall call the Hillsoft Infinibook(TM) the action of turning to page three from two causes a silent whisper mechanism to take page one off the spine and feed it through the back binding to the back of the book and then reconnect it to the spine. Going backwards to page two reverses the process. During this process the page that goes to the back or front is refreshed with the appropriate page data. In this way, you can instinctively read it like a real book ergonomically with no gadget knowledge required which in my opinion is the absolute key feature in the design.

In the inner spine between the pages i'd have a line of vertical touch sensitive buttons to control bringing up a menu on the current pages for browsing the current book chapter list and also for looking at the library of current books held in the onboard memory. Exact choice of these core buttons I am not sure on but probably "MENU", "NEXT" "PREV" and "OK" would be my choices with the on page highlight indicating clearly what "OK" will select. You could even do away with the elaborate page swap mechanism I describe above and just put more pages in the book with the "NEXT" button on the spine simply refreshing all the pages with the next set of pages in the book if all pages are flipped over to the left. You then just flip the pages back to the front and carry on reading. Personally as a gadget freak I like the idea of the infinitely turning book but maybe more epaper pages is a more cost effective solution. R&D dept will have to thrash that one out. :)

Bottom back edge of the leather spine would look worn and frayed from age but lifting it up would reveal waterproof springloaded covers for a USB2.0 connector and a power connector for synching with a desktop or laptop and downloading books just like an ipod does for digital music and for charging the onboard battery housed in the spine.

Get this puppy to market and even your granny will want one. :)
« Last Edit: November 15, 2010, 22:19:34 PM by Captain Ron »
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Captain Ron

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Re: The experience of a book
« Reply #38 on: November 15, 2010, 22:21:47 PM »
Magnification buttons in the spine would also be a boon to readers with less than perfect vision. I'd leave font control and the like in the menu display.
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Captain Ron

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Re: The experience of a book
« Reply #39 on: November 15, 2010, 22:23:34 PM »
Actually, come to think of it, "Book 2" would be a truly great name for it. :)
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Slim

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Re: The experience of a book
« Reply #40 on: November 16, 2010, 10:52:54 AM »
What is needed for the ebook to dominate is an ereader with a similar ergonomic feel to an actual book. Reproducing the FEEL of a book is vital. Not a screen or a tablet.

I don't agree at all there. I think that's a bit like saying that what the motor car needed to dominate was for it to feel like a horse and cart.

While you presently associate the feel of paper with the experience of reading a book, these things are not critical to the actual purpose of a book, which is all about the plot, the narrative, the talent of the writer and the rest of it.

Think how popular the online editions of the daily newspapers are, or the BBC News website. None of them allow the viewer to experience the rustle of paper on visiting a new page, or to get smudgy ink marks on his or her fingers.

Reg

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Re: The experience of a book
« Reply #41 on: January 19, 2011, 13:52:47 PM »
My primary desire for an electronic book reader would be for technical books for work.  Programming reference manuals and the like.  And whilst .pdfs etc., are handy on a laptop for reference, they are just not as easy to 'browse' through, or scan, looking for a particular reference item.  They would save a lot space though.

And of course, electronic publishing, like digital music publishing before it, gives the freedom for people to either publish themselves, and sell through word of mouth, with little outlay, or for a major publisher to release a book they wouldn't normally deal with - I'm particularly thinking of niche technical manuals, but this could apply to anything.
Standing in the shadows, hiding from the light
Reach out in the darkness, and hold on for your life
All the fear of the future, all the emptiness inside
When the moment of truth arrives, hey, you can run but you can't hide