Author Topic: The experience of a book  (Read 9354 times)

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Bassassin

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Re: The experience of a book
« Reply #15 on: September 04, 2008, 09:58:18 AM »
I don't think electronic books will ever dominate the market or replace print media entirely - for the same reason I don't think this will happen with music, movies, games or other media.

Apart from there being far too much money tied up in the manufacture & retail of "hard" product - the bottom line is that people like things - tangible solid objects they can hold & touch & look at. That's part of the essence of materialism.

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Slim

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Re: The experience of a book
« Reply #16 on: September 12, 2008, 08:26:17 AM »
It's true that people enjoy owning a physical object. But it hasn't stopped downloads from replacing CD singles, and albums in many cases, has it? And it won't stop them replacing the paper book, ultimately.

Currently it's much less ergonomic to read a PDA or Internet tablet on the train than a paperback, but that will surely change eventually. There are so many obvious benefits to the latter approach: being able to back up your books and find them instantly, iPod style; being able to read them in exactly the typeface you want, having your entire 'bookcase' with you on holiday, and so on.

The copyright theft issue is certainly going to be a problem, but I don't think it will prevent digital books from dominating ultimately. Again, it hasn't stopped digital music.

34Poolboy

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Re: The experience of a book
« Reply #17 on: September 12, 2008, 09:54:01 AM »
I`m not entirely sure about this and I`m also not convinced by the "digital music has taken over so ultimately digital books will also" arguement.

The way we listen hasn`t really changed. Sound waves are sound waves wether reproduced by a Gramophone needle or the latest digital sampling technology. They hit the eardrum in the same way.
It has however always been a problem reading for extended periods of time from a computer screen no matter what dimming and font changing possibilitys there are. It is still easier to read from the printed page. For this reason many websites are very concise relying more on images than on text.

Digital books may well ultimately take over but the Digital books/digital music comparison relates purely to convenience.

Slim

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Re: The experience of a book
« Reply #18 on: September 12, 2008, 12:39:37 PM »
Quote
I`m not entirely sure about this and I`m also not convinced by the "digital music has taken over so ultimately digital books will also" argument.

The way we listen hasn`t really changed. Sound waves are sound waves whether reproduced by a Gramophone needle or the latest digital sampling technology. They hit the eardrum in the same way.
It has however always been a problem reading for extended periods of time from a computer screen no matter what dimming and font changing possibilities there are. It is still easier to read from the printed page. For this reason many websites are very concise relying more on images than on text.

Yes, that's true now, but it almost certainly won't be in the future - which is why I confined my remarks to the future tense.


Thenop

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Re: The experience of a book
« Reply #19 on: September 12, 2008, 18:48:43 PM »
I think Slim is right wrt the digital books. However, I think it'll be more mainstream publications (what we now buy as paperbacks) that will be popular in the end. As the technology develops or better: is being presented on the market (cause I am sure there's enough developed and not released yet that would make us all 'want one of those') the digital publications will grow in popularity.
Even though I like a morning paper, I can live without that as well. I just as easy pop onto the Internet and check the latest headlines. I'm a news junie anyway, so for me it's ideal.

The hardcase books will not cease to exist. There's simply a market for it. I do think that with the rise of the digital books the price will drop for the downloads and will rise for the prints.
Until then though, I keep on stocking the cupboards at home just as the attic and the ever growing bin of books to sell / give away...

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34Poolboy

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Re: The experience of a book
« Reply #20 on: September 12, 2008, 19:30:59 PM »
The technology is surely present now, and has been for years. At least as long as digital music. Where digital music has all but taken over from other forms, the digital book still seems to struggle.
When I look at the Frankfurt Book show, the amount of publishers and books on offer rises year after year. Digital media are also represented, yet the book still represents by far the favourite way of reading. What is on the increase is books on CD, whereas in the past it used to take a while for a book to be narrated onto CD, the release of book and CD is now almost simultaneous.
Although I still also believe the digital book will increase in popularity I predict it to be a much slower rise and to nowhere near the extent of digital music. the main reason for this is simple.

We can listen to music whilst doing almost anything, try riding a bike whilst reading a book!
« Last Edit: September 12, 2008, 19:32:49 PM by 34Poolboy »

Slim

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Re: The experience of a book
« Reply #21 on: September 12, 2008, 22:33:06 PM »
Quote
The technology is surely present now, and has been for years. At least as long as digital music. Where digital music has all but taken over from other forms, the digital book still seems to struggle.

The technology for eBooks is present now, but it suffers from the limitation that material presented in a portable form isn't that easy to read, and from the fact that most people don't have a suitable portable 'viewer'. Both of those things will change.

Quote
When I look at the Frankfurt Book show, the amount of publishers and books on offer rises year after year. Digital media are also represented, yet the book still represents by far the favourite way of reading. What is on the increase is books on CD, whereas in the past it used to take a while for a book to be narrated onto CD, the release of book and CD is now almost simultaneous.

Although I still also believe the digital book will increase in popularity I predict it to be a much slower rise and to nowhere near the extent of digital music. the main reason for this is simple.

We can listen to music whilst doing almost anything, try riding a bike whilst reading a book!

To be frank I don't think this is a strong argument. I can't ride a bike while reading a paperback, either.

Digital music hasn't really enabled people to listen music while riding a bike; you could do that 25 years ago with a Walkman. Of course you can carry a lot more stuff round with you with an iPod, but the same is true with digital literature too.

Quite honestly the advantages in terms of immediacy and availability of distribution, portability and flexibility will prove irresistible, I'm sure.

34Poolboy

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Re: The experience of a book
« Reply #22 on: September 12, 2008, 23:36:34 PM »
Quote

The technology for eBooks is present now, but it suffers from the limitation that material presented in a portable form isn't that easy to read, and from the fact that most people don't have a suitable portable 'viewer'. Both of those things will change.

I just thought we`d be there by now Slim, or at least very close to getting there.

I know the technology is present, I`ve honestly NEVER seen anyone using it in a portable form.

You may well prove me wrong and it`s success will far exceed my imagination. I still love having books around me and can`t imagine living without them.

Graham Hyde

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Re: The experience of a book
« Reply #23 on: September 24, 2008, 12:57:53 PM »
Amazon.com are selling the KINDLE, this looks like a much more useful device and probably the way things will go here.

Slim

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Re: The experience of a book
« Reply #24 on: September 24, 2008, 13:11:02 PM »
Brilliant idea - an electronic book reader that you can use to buy your books. It looks clunky, but this sort of thing is in its infancy.

Slim

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Reg

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Re: The experience of a book
« Reply #26 on: September 28, 2008, 19:49:50 PM »
Needless to say, Sony have an option, the e-Reader.  
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rufus the dawg

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Re: The experience of a book
« Reply #27 on: October 28, 2008, 18:21:27 PM »
and what about those books that famous people read to us. surely in the future we will not need to read everything will be spoken to us.

NOT

Dixkot

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Re: The experience of a book
« Reply #28 on: November 01, 2008, 23:14:17 PM »


The readers look fantastic.  A bit pricey though.

Slim

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Re: The experience of a book
« Reply #29 on: June 14, 2009, 20:08:31 PM »
I worked out last week that a 4GB SD card costing a few quid will hold about 4,000 paperbacks, or about 20,000 (losslessly) compressed. One good reason why the writing's on the wall (and not on the paper) for books.