• Welcome to The National Midday Sun. Please login or sign up.
June 26, 2019, 02:37:42 am

Languages

Started by Ashley, November 28, 2005, 14:36:01 pm

Previous topic - Next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Ashley

After reminding myself of my nightmare German trip, what languages do people speak in addition to their native tongue.

I am sure our continental cousins are about to shame us Brits with their skills.



Dods

Quote

I am sure our continental cousins are about to shame us Brits with their skills.

Without doubt. It is embarrassing just how ignorant we are when it comes to language. I try my best when away but hardly fluent in anything (except Doric of course  ;D)


derrydale

For me, learning some German is/was most helpful as it is spoken in Austria, Switzerland, northern Italy any other northern european countries.

We/us English speakers are lucky in that in most european counties many there speak our language better than we do.

The biggest problem is not the language but the different cultures and ways of doing things!

derrydale

MarkH

I speak German or rather I used to. I've hardly used it lately and I've become very rusty. Still, I'm ashamed to say that I speak German better than I can speak Welsh.

Dixkot

Quote

Without doubt. It is embarrassing just how ignorant we are when it comes to language.


When you learning English Dods?





Ron

English (understood by Brits and Americans ;))
Dutch, obviously
Some German
Some French
Dat geluk verdwijnt voor geld


Ahoy, Ahoy, Ahoy, Ahoy, Madison Square Garden, Wembley Arena, Ahoy, Ahoy, Ahoy.

Crewe

dwtty

English
Intermediate on the Welsh

Dixkot



When my parents lived in Spain I went to night school for a couple of years and did Spanish.  Not to bad at it after a few days climatization.



Neph

I was useless at languages at school, although never turning up was probably to blame for that. My wife, on the other hand, is a bit of a whizz. She has a degree in German with French although it was mainly medieval German literature that was studied. She now wants to learn Spanish so I've got her one of those Berlitz language courses for her Christmas.

döm

Pretty fluent in both French and Spanish - French through studying it up to degree level (having a French dad helped a little bit  ::) ) and Spanish as I spent 4 years there teaching English.

I'm going to have to learn Irish (Gaeilge) now as my son has just started going to an Irish speaking school and can already have conversations with his mum - I of course don't have a clue.
You can check out any time you like but you can never leave!

Fishy

una cerveza por favor....thats about my limit...
From the Land of Honest Men.

stereoroid

November 29, 2005, 22:13:58 pm #11 Last Edit: November 29, 2005, 22:15:01 pm by stereoroid
I learned Afrikaans, since I was emigrated from Scotland to South Africa at age 6 and did all my remaining school there. Since I returned to the UK in 1991, I've tried to forget it, but keep meeting Afrikaners. It's also left me with some Dutch ability, especially reading.

For the last 18 months or so I've been studying Japanese. Not a language for the faint-hearted. Just when you think you are making progress, you try and translate a bit of normal English, and find you can't express what you want without digging through a grammar guide. Oh yes: the "school" version you learn has some tenuous relation to what they speak in Tokyo, which is to Osaka as London is to Newcastle...  ::)

Red

French, some spanish and esperanto, though of recent I am learning Japanese to co-inside with a possible occupation change.

John_W._List

I SPEAK ENGLISH TO FOREIGNERS SLOWLY, LOUDLY AND CLEARLY:)


I also speak French, a small amount of German, an even smaller amount of Italian and I am slowly expanding a meagre Welsh vocabulary.

dwtty

QuoteI SPEAK ENGLISH TO FOREIGNERS SLOWLY, LOUDLY AND CLEARLY:)


I also speak French, a small amount of German, an even smaller amount of Italian and I am slowly expanding a meagre Welsh vocabulary.


Cymraeg? Pam?