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No Time To Die

Started by Matt2112, September 30, 2021, 23:56:05 PM

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October 03, 2021, 01:40:34 AM #15 Last Edit: October 03, 2021, 01:42:44 AM by DavidL
Any film based on a character that manages to avoid certain death with such regularity is not to be taken seriously IMO...no matter who plays him. 
It's for the kids really, isn't it?..... ;)

I think the best thing that McCartney did outside the Beatles was Cilla's Step Inside Love. Then Maybe I'm Amazed.





QuoteAny film based on a character that manages to avoid certain death with such regularity is not to be taken seriously IMO...no matter who plays him.
It's for the kids really, isn't it?..... ;)


Well everyone wants something different from a Bond film, which is why it's hard to rank or compare them. But if the Earth was to be hit by a comet, the ones I'd take for posterity on the spaceship out would be:

From Russia With Love - brilliant villainy from Robert Shaw - he's a brutal KGB undercover assassin, not a megalomaniac psychopath and this is a proper, tense spy film.
Thunderball - brilliant theme tune and imaginative underwater scenes. Clever plot involving stealing nukes from NATO.
The Living Daylights - the proper, dour, world-weary but hard and resourceful professional killer out of the novels.
Tomorrow Never Dies - the best of the Brosnan outings; he was a creditable 007 and this is a highly entertaining flick.
Casino Royale - flawed but classy. Notable for its status as a reboot.


I quite liked Spectre as well but those are the 5 important ones for me.

Caught up with this, this afternoon.

I concur with Matt that the theme song is the weakest link here.

Other than that, not a lot negative to say. Well, nothing really.

Director Cory Joji Fukunaga handles everything from large-scale set pieces down to close-up violence with aplomb.

Very difficult to discuss this film without spoilers, as over the course of 2 and 43 minutes there is a lot to spoil, so I won't discuss it.

Also as Matt and others have said, this is a very fitting end to Daniel Craig's tenure as 007. Apart from Quantum Of Solace, this has been a very solid run of films. And you cannot pin that film's failure on him.

I don't think this is a spoiler as such, but it was a nice touch to feature an homage within the film to the opening "barrel of a gun" sequence. You will see what I mean.

Overall, this is definitely the film to get mainstream audiences back to the cinema.

Now looking forward to Dune later this month I think, and Matrix Resurrections in December, for which the trailer has certainly got those Matrix goosebumps going again.

This is one of those films that really deserves to be seen on a big screen. Imax if possible - not just for the picture, but for the sound too.

Anyhoo - if I had to give a score, then 9 out of 10. Loses one for the theme song.
Standing in the shadows, hiding from the light<br />Reach out in the darkness, and hold on for your life<br />All the fear of the future, all the emptiness inside<br />When the moment of truth arrives, hey, you can run but you can't hide

Excellent Reg; yes, there are some very nice "grace notes" at certain points, the gun barrel moment probably being the best one for me. :)
The keys to happiness

October 08, 2021, 22:46:17 PM #20 Last Edit: October 09, 2021, 01:45:16 AM by Richard_2112
I caught this earlier on today. It's a very solid effort and a definite end to the Craig era. Personally I thought as enjoyable as it was it was riddled with plot holes, but at least it wasn't a rub-your-face-in-it diversity kick at Bond being a past-it straight white male that the trailers made it out to be. Personal highlight was the excellent action sequence involving Ana De Armas's character. Also you can't fault the direction of this film as it is visually stunning!

I can see the ending of this film being very divisive but people need to remember that this is a self-contained series of 5 films that are a reboot - Daniel Craig is not meant to be a continuation of Connery, Lazonby, Moore, Dalton, and Brosnon.
Over thinking, over analyzing separates the body from the mind. Withering my intuition, missing opportunities and I must feed my will to feel my moment drawing way outside the lines.



Quotenot just for the picture, but for the sound too.


There was a point when a bartender is making Bond a drink and I smirked to myself at how clear the audible *plop* was when putting the olive in the glass. The sound design for this film is flawless!
Over thinking, over analyzing separates the body from the mind. Withering my intuition, missing opportunities and I must feed my will to feel my moment drawing way outside the lines.

Well - I'm not sure that was quite what I want or expect from a Bond film, but it certainly was very entertaining. Off to bed in a minute but a few quick thoughts.

First off - finally, Daniel Craig owns James Bond. He finally did grow into the role. He wasn't just a grimly brutal and sometimes callous professional killer. He's got a bit of charm and humour at last and he carries it well.

Second - Bond films aren't spy thrillers now, they're action films now. I get that. But do we really have to see him defeat a small army of land rovers, then take out a whole battalion of heavily armed mercenaries? It was overcooked. It leans into self-parody. Far better if he could just be placed in situations where he can overcome his opponents more plausibly. Would be cheaper to film, as well.

Third - some nice nods to the past. The "poison garden" which although it wasn't in the film, was the subject of the You Only Live Twice novel. The portrait of Robert Brown (who played M in the '80s). The OHMSS theme music (from both ends of the film). Although I don't think the classic 007 theme was used until late on, which surprised me.

Fourth - this film is out there. It's RIGHT out there. It reminded me of one of those wacky '60s spy-fi films from when hallucinogenic drugs were more fashionable, like Billion Dollar Brain It put me in mind of the old Avengers TV series. Emma Peel would have fitted right in. This film is roughly half way to Austin Powers. But I didn't really mind that. I especially liked the invincible CIA chick who likes a drink.

Some have described this film as having been blighted by political correctness; I'd even heard that it was "ruined by blue-haired feminists", but for me it wasn't. I didn't mind the uber-fit black chick 00 operative. I think she was great, actually. I don't think you'd get that in real life of course, but this film is so heavily invested in artistic absurdism that you simply have to accept it as being part of the bonkers.

This is, religiously, a Bond Film. It even has the villain's secret base getting blown up. They should have kitted the henchmen out in orange boiler suits. It's not the gritty spy thriller that I'd have liked, but it is a whole lot of fun.

Brave ending, but one that will clear the decks for the next 007.

For me - the best of the Craig Bond outings, or certainly the most enjoyable, anyway.

Another couple of thoughts.

Odd  that there's a portrait of the 1980s M at Secret Service HQ, but not the classic, original M from the '60s films, played by Bernard Lee.

But now that his hair has thinned out even further and his waistline has expanded a bit, Ralph Fiennes is a much more authentic, ageing establishment figure M. They've even given him the sort of austere, post-war, slicked back haircut favoured by gentleman of a certain age in the early '60s. A bit anachronistic in the present day, but a nice touch. I thought he was very good in this.


Just watched it. Loved it really as did my wife, except maybe for the last 10-15 minutes which just seemed a bit rushed. I agree with Richard_2112 above that the Cuba action with Ana De Armas was the highlight. But all in all a fitting end to DCs run of movies.

Watched this on't tele last night...there were some nice widescreen location shots and a lot of violence, as you'd expect, and it was nice to see the old DB5 make a brief cameo but the storylines felt a bit clichéd and the epic scale and invention of the stunts from previous Bond films was surprisingly and disappointingly absent from this one... perhaps the producers/financiers felt they couldn't justify the expense due to the knock on financial effect of the lockdowns on filming as well as the impact those would have on audience figures?

Better looking than your average Tory Cabinet Minister

The Summer of Soul 1969......(or why the Revolution wasn't televised)
Better looking than your average Tory Cabinet Minister


QuoteWatched this on't tele last night...there were some nice widescreen location shots and a lot of violence, as you'd expect, and it was nice to see the old DB5 make a brief cameo but the storylines felt a bit clichéd and the epic scale and invention of the stunts from previous Bond films was surprisingly and disappointingly absent from this one... perhaps the producers/financiers felt they couldn't justify the expense due to the knock on financial effect of the lockdowns on filming as well as the impact those would have on audience figures?



The lockdowns didn't have an effect on filming, fortunately - all the photography was completed by October 2019, probably before the first human cases of COVID-19. It was originally going to be released to the cinemas by April 2020.

Agree that the story is cliched, especially in a Bond film context. But most of the Bond films are.