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Obscure Rush Reference

Started by Gandalf, July 15, 2008, 22:07:29 PM

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My gas reading last month was 21121
Everybody's got to evalate from the norm.

saw this online earlier. A pat on the back for anyone who guesses correctly who wrote it

A friend of mine made quite a profound and insightful remark earlier, when he compared Rush's deeply corporate 1993 album Counterparts with the ITV television programme The X Factor.

It may not be obvious at first, but in fact these two products share precisely the same ethos: they are designed for maximum commercial appeal to a lowest common denominator audience.
Counterparts is an album composed entirely of the sort of deliberately inoffensive, intentionally generic, calculatedly unchallenging rock music that sells seats at concert venues, shifts units in record stores and attracts radio airplay.
The X Factor churns out similarly shallow, cynically manufactured pop stars with essentially the same purpose.
But The X Factor is a lot more fun than Counterparts. Think how much more fun Counterparts would be if you could watch people in the band failing an audition or getting voted out.

The new songs are an abomination

Quote from: Jonners on September 08, 2021, 13:42:15 PMsaw this online earlier. A pat on the back for anyone who guesses correctly who wrote it

A friend of mine made quite a profound and insightful remark earlier, when he compared Rush's deeply corporate 1993 album Counterparts with the ITV television programme The X Factor.

It may not be obvious at first, but in fact these two products share precisely the same ethos: they are designed for maximum commercial appeal to a lowest common denominator audience.
Counterparts is an album composed entirely of the sort of deliberately inoffensive, intentionally generic, calculatedly unchallenging rock music that sells seats at concert venues, shifts units in record stores and attracts radio airplay.
The X Factor churns out similarly shallow, cynically manufactured pop stars with essentially the same purpose.
But The X Factor is a lot more fun than Counterparts. Think how much more fun Counterparts would be if you could watch people in the band failing an audition or getting voted out.


Has to be Slim. No one else could be that pompous
Better drowned than duffers if not duffers wont drown


Quotesaw this online earlier. A pat on the back for anyone who guesses correctly who wrote it

A friend of mine made quite a profound and insightful remark earlier, when he compared Rush's deeply corporate 1993 album Counterparts with the ITV television programme The X Factor.

It may not be obvious at first, but in fact these two products share precisely the same ethos: they are designed for maximum commercial appeal to a lowest common denominator audience.
Counterparts is an album composed entirely of the sort of deliberately inoffensive, intentionally generic, calculatedly unchallenging rock music that sells seats at concert venues, shifts units in record stores and attracts radio airplay.
The X Factor churns out similarly shallow, cynically manufactured pop stars with essentially the same purpose.
But The X Factor is a lot more fun than Counterparts. Think how much more fun Counterparts would be if you could watch people in the band failing an audition or getting voted out.


Load of bollocks. Decent album.

Quote from: zoony on September 08, 2021, 20:11:15 PMLoad of bollocks. Decent album.

It wasn't your quote then  ;D
Better drowned than duffers if not duffers wont drown

September 08, 2021, 23:57:14 PM #230 Last Edit: September 08, 2021, 23:59:30 PM by Slim
Quotesaw this online earlier. A pat on the back for anyone who guesses correctly who wrote it

A friend of mine made quite a profound and insightful remark earlier, when he compared Rush's deeply corporate 1993 album Counterparts with the ITV television programme The X Factor.

It may not be obvious at first, but in fact these two products share precisely the same ethos: they are designed for maximum commercial appeal to a lowest common denominator audience.

Counterparts is an album composed entirely of the sort of deliberately inoffensive, intentionally generic, calculatedly unchallenging rock music that sells seats at concert venues, shifts units in record stores and attracts radio airplay.

The X Factor churns out similarly shallow, cynically manufactured pop stars with essentially the same purpose.

But The X Factor is a lot more fun than Counterparts. Think how much more fun Counterparts would be if you could watch people in the band failing an audition or getting voted out.



A very adroit observation, that.


QuoteLoad of bollocks. Decent album.

Hear, hear!

At the time, I liked it ( or at least the first few songs) as it sounded like the band had rediscovered their "balls" again, first four tracks in particular. 

But then it tails off VERY BADLY indeed, until the much underrated Cold Fire

I like the Live versions of the songs I have heard now,, but struggle to find the will to put the studio version on play anywmore
The new songs are an abomination

I listened to it once in 1993, realised it was crap and put it away with the genuine intention of never listening to it again. However for discussion and review purposes I've listened through three or four times since, and I've heard live versions of some of the tunes at gigs a few times.

Can't really disagree with a word of that assessment above.

It seems to me that the reviewer is more interested in  judging the people who actually like Counterparts rather than the music itself
When the truth offends we lie and lie until we can longer remember it is even there. But it is still there. Every lie we tell incurs a debt to the truth. Sooner or later, that debt is repaid

September 09, 2021, 18:28:12 PM #235 Last Edit: September 10, 2021, 12:49:23 PM by Anna Woriboutchu
QuoteI listened to it once in 1993, realised it was crap and put it away with the genuine intention of never listening to it again. However for discussion and review purposes I've listened through three or four times since, and I've heard live versions of some of the tunes at gigs a few times.

Can't really disagree with a word of that assessment above.
How amazing that individual listeners can differ so much and yet still have common ground. It takes me a good three or four listens of ANYTHING to begin to really appreciate and like it (if I do like it that is). Hemispheres is a masterpiece that I'll treasure within me forever, but it took me about half a dozen plays to emerge from the maze of confusion it threw me into until that point of appreciation and getting it. Counterparts understandably wasn't such a long process to get there and I've always loved it.

QuoteHemispheres is a masterpiece that I'll treasure within me forever, but it took me about half a dozen plays to emerge from the maze of confusion it through me into until that point of appreciation and getting it.

I don't think even the band ever emerged from the maze of confusion of side one of Hemispheres  ;D

Neve liked Side 1, never will (hemispheres)
The new songs are an abomination


QuoteNeve liked Side 1, never will (hemispheres)
I do like it, but as is the case with 2112, I prefer side 2 of both albums. Definitely prefer Cygnus X-1 over part 2 as well.